I Ate the State – Klickitat County

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Greetings!

Washington State packs a powerful punch when it comes to celebrating diversity. Whether it be via environment, culture or history, Washington fully represents and Klickitat County is no slouch. Within a single afternoon of exploring the area, I took in towering volcanoes (plural!), spacious forests, sweeping plains, grand rivers and ancient canyons. I enjoyed delicious bounty, learned of amazing history, hiked beautiful trails and even wandered around an abbey shared by Buddhists and Druids. All this in just one afternoon – and that was truly just the tip of the volcano! Join me while I discover what spectacular adventures Klickitat County has to offer. (And I’ll still only be scratching the surface!)

Named for the Klickitat Tribe, now part of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Klickitat County is located in the south-central area of the state. Falling near the middle in size, the population sits closer towards the bottom of the list. (29th out of 39 in population, to be exact) In a nutshell, it’s very easy to stretch out in Klickitat County – and to possibly not see anyone around for miles. And miles… It’s quite something to be able to stop in the middle of the road to take a picture and not be worried about someone driving up behind.

Bickleton Hwy
The Bickleton Highway after a spring rain. Not a car in sight…

Klickitat County is a very accessible county, from both Washington and Oregon. It neighbors Yakima, Skamania and Benton Counties and sits directly across the mighty Columbia River from Oregon. There are many routes in and out of the county within Washington as well as several bridges over the Columbia River to Oregon. This can make for many great quick-trips! It also has the benefit of being in the south-central part of the state, so it’s a relatively doable day trip from many parts of Washington. That said, as there are so many amazing things to see and do, I’d definitely recommend at least an overnight stay.

As I live in the western part of the state, I typically take I-90 to Yakima via I-82 and then Exit 37 onto US-97 towards Bend and Goldendale. I love heading over Satus Pass and enjoy the change of forest from the firs and spruce of the west side to the Ponderosa pines of the east. This route also allows me to stop at the very unique St. John’s Monastery & Bakery, located just off US-97 near the lovely Brooks Memorial State Park. The resident nuns and novices make the most delicious traditional Greek pastries, candies, soups, handcrafted candles and more. A must stop! (Open Monday – Saturday, 9am – 6pm)

For my most recent foray into Klickitat County, however, I was coming from nearby Sunnyside, so I headed towards Bickleton via WA-22 to Mabton and then onto the Mabton-Bickleton Road. Tiny Bickleton is reached via quiet, winding backroads and the drive is well worth the effort. Stunning vistas, rolling fields and high desert plains are de rigueur and it’s hard not to see beauty in every turn of the road. (And there are many turns!) If you happen to visit during the spring, there are the added glories of wildflowers, fresh sage brush and possibly spring rain. (Spring sage in the spring rain is one of the dreamiest smells ever!) If you take this route, be sure to pull over randomly and take in the scene. And the air. And the silence. Beautiful

Pro tip: Reception can be spotty along the roads to and from Bickleton – and the roads are often very, very quiet. (In many parts of Klickitat County in general.) Be sure to get that oil change and tire check before venturing off into the wilds and always bring along an old-school paper map. And snacks. Always bring snacks. And probably some water.

Known as theBluebird Capitol of the World, Bickleton is a tiny, but lovely jewel in the high desert of the county. (Population 90!) Thousands of bluebirds spend much of their year in the area, making their homes in the lovely birdhouses dotting area fence lines. If you are coming to the area via Mabton, Ponderosa pines begin to pop up just outside of town and wildflowers cheerfully dot the landscape. It truly is a gorgeous drive and ends with a step back in time once you’ve arrived in Bickleton proper.

As mentioned, Bickleton is quite small, but there are definitely places to explore and several events throughout the year to check out. On your next high desert adventure, consider these great options:

  • Should you be interested in wetting your whistle in the oldest operating tavern in the state (c. 1887), be sure to sidle up at the Bluebird Inn. Grab a drink and great burger and relax in this nostalgia-filled gem. (Open Wednesday – 7am to 8pm, Thursday-Saturday – 10am to 8pm and Sunday – 8am to 6pm. Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the entire month of December.) NOTE: Not to be confused with The Brick Saloon in Kittitas County, which lays claim to the oldest, continuously operating bar in the state. (c. 1889) DON’T MIX THEM UP! Fight, fight, FIGHT! Bar/Saloon/Tavern brawl anyone?
  • Grab food to go or take a seat in the café at the charming Bickleton Market Street Café & Grocery. Offering tasty burgers, hot and cold sandwiches and more, they’re a great stop in the area. (Open Monday – Friday, 7am to 6pm and Saturday, 7am to 11am. Closed Sunday.)
  • Be sure to make a stop at the Bickleton Carousel Museum and take in the festive scene. The museum features a lovely Herschell-Spillman Carousel (c. 1900) as well as area history. It is one of only three of its type still working, which is amazing when you consider 121 years of rowdy fair-goers. (Open Friday & Saturday, 10am – 3pm and Sunday, Noon – 4pm. Open spring through late fall.)
  • You can find the aforementioned carousel in full operation once a year at the… Alder Creek Pioneer Picnic & Rodeo (June 12-13, 2021, 10th – 12th for 2022) It is Washington’s oldest rodeo and this year marked its impressive 110th anniversary. (c. 1910) Located in nearby Cleveland Park, it’s a classic rodeo scene set amidst Ponderosa pines and a rustic park scene. I recently attended and had the pleasure of riding the carousel and eating a GIANT corndog and elephant ear. It was a great time, indeed. (Hot Tip: Cleveland Park is also known as Alder Creek Pioneer Rodeo and Picnic Area if you happen to be searching on Google. If you’re lucky enough to have reception, that is!)
  • If you have a penchant for classic cars and flea markets, be sure to hit up the Bickleton Classic Car Show – and flea market! Taking place at the Carousel Museum over Labor Day weekend, it’s a fun way to wrap up the summer. (My dad has attended and gives it his seal of approval. 😉 The event was cancelled for 2020, but hopefully 2021 will be a go.

One of my favorite stretches of road in the state lies between Bickleton and the nearby town of Goldendale. Traveling west out of town on the Bickleton-Goldendale Highway will take you through Ponderosa-filled forest and into high plains brimming with wildflowers and sage brush. (And the occasional, lonely tumbleweed blowing across the road.) I love pulling over along the way and just standing outside. The smell of the flowers and sage is amazing and on a recent trip, there was a bit of spring rain to bring it all out. No one on the road, the only sound the wind and a sense that this scene has remained exactly the same for a very long time… Sublime.

As the high plains begin to lose elevation, the road starts to wind and twist into an absolutely stunning area known as Badger Gulch. As the road descends into the deep valley, switchbacks and hairpin turns compete with impressive views for your attention. On my last drive through the area, the sun was shining, but at the same time it was raining. Amazing rainbows and god-rays sifting through the clouds accompanied me as I navigated my way through the switchbacks. Glorious! (Pro Tip: Keep your eyes on the road, or just occasionally pull over. I hate to admit that I’m prone to taking pictures out of my window as I drive, but not in this area. Nope. EYES ON THE ROAD, please.)

Once out of the dastardly, but beautiful, Badger Gulch the road calms down as you make your way towards Goldendale, the county seat of Klickitat County. Nestled in the foothills of the Simcoe Mountains, Goldendale is known for its wheat, cattle, alfalfa and hay. (Which means I get to bust out my classic “Hay!” joke whenever in the area. You’re welcome.) It is easy to breeze through the area if you’re traveling on US-97, but the town is well worth a stop. Interesting history, good barbeque and a night sky chock-full of stars are just a few of its draws. Throw in an amazing view of nearby Mount Adams and I’m never disappointed with my time in Goldendale.

Klickitat Valley
Hay!! And alfalfa, wheat, sheep and cattle!

If you find yourself in this lovely part of the state, there are many things to occupy your time and imagination. A few places to check out while in the area:

  • Goldendale is famous for its dark skies and up until recently carried the ‘Dark Sky’ designation. Sadly, this has since been removed, but hopefully Washington State will rally to have it re-established. Nevertheless, the area skies are indeed still very dark and magnificently showcase the night sky. One of the nation’s largest public observatories, Goldendale Observatory (and state park) offers an amazing look into the cosmos and a beautiful opportunity to explore the area surrounding the observatory. Newly renovated and state of the art, the observatory offers both day and night time viewings and is a must-stop if you’re visiting the area. They are currently requiring reservations until Covid restrictions are further lifted, so look online before you go. (Regular schedule resumes August 13th and drop-in visits will be allowed.) While in the area, be sure to take a quick hike through the nearby Observatory Hills Trails to enjoy the local flora and fauna. (Discover Pass required for observatory parking.) Author’s Note: The observatory was closed on my most recent visit to the area, but I’ll be returning in August and will update with pictures. I’ve visited the observatory in the past and am very excited to check out the updates! And that spectacular night sky…
  • Set back from the quaint downtown area, the Presby Museum – and Klickitat County Historical Society offers a well-curated look into the yesteryears of Goldendale and the surrounding area. Set inside the stately Presby Mansion, it’s a fine way to spend an afternoon. (May 1st – October 15th, 10am – 4pm daily)
  • There are several standard hotels in the area, but why not go big? Check out The Red House on Airbnb for a step back in time. Featured on both state and federal Historic Registers, you get the whole house to explore and imagine life in late 1800s Goldendale. (c. 1890. Originally the home of Charles Newell, the Horse King of the Northwest.) Author’s Note: I haven’t stayed there yet, but I’ll be taking care of that in August. Pictures coming soon!
  • If you’re looking for an opportunity to don those boots and polish that belt buckle, or the chance to eat A LOT of fair food, the Klickitat County Fair & Rodeo is the place to be. Given the opportunity, I’m pretty sure I could eat my weight in delicious corn dogs and elephant ears. Mmmm… (August 19-22, 2021)

What’s that? You didn’t fill up on corndogs and elephant ears at the fair?? Hmmm… Well, lucky for you, there are some great dining options in the area. Stop in at one of these fine spots the next time you’re in town:

  • If you’re a fan of BBQ (Yes, please!) head directly to The Dirty Cowgirl. Originally a food truck, Chef Kory Geddes has grown her operation into a full-service restaurant. On my recent visit, I was fortunate enough to get the very last order of brisket for the day. Moowahahahaha… SO GOOD! (Open daily, 11am – 9pm; 10pm on Friday/Saturday and 8pm on Sunday)
  • For a great breakfast, lunch or dinner, head to the Town House Café in the downtown area. This charming spot is very popular for its tasty, home-style cooking. (Wednesday to Sunday, 7am – 2pm with dinners to 7pm on Fridays. Closed Monday/Tuesday.)
  • Dwinell Country Ales offers an impressive line of craft beer and cider. The tasting room is currently closed, but private tastings are available by reservation on their tasting room patio. They are also open Saturday and Sunday from 1-4pm for beer-to-go.
  • Should you be in the mood for an old-school tavern and café experience, check out the Simcoe Café located in the heart of downtown. If those walls could talk… (Daily, 11am to 12pm, 2am on Friday/Saturday.)
  • The Goldendale has a bounty of produce and tasty treats to offer. If that sounds delicious, stop by the Goldendale Farmers Market and grab some goodies! (Saturdays at the Goldendale Chamber Grounds from May – September, 9am – 2pm)

After staying the night in one of the chain hotels off of US-97, I was very ready to head further south and do some wine-tasting and exploring along the Columbia River Gorge. And do some tasting of wine… (Did I mention doing some wine tasting?) As I headed south on US-97, the morning was brilliantly sunny and the windmills dotting the hills were in full swing. It’s amazing how large they are from a distance and this part of the drive allowed me to see just how large they actually are. Suffice to say, there’s quite a bit of energy being created by these behemoths. Klickitat County hosts several wind farms throughout the county, thoroughly utilizing the constant, sweeping winds of the area. Some may find them a challenge to the landscape and view, but I’ve always thought them strangely scenic. And hey, clean energy sources are always good!

Another sight along the way offers a prime opportunity to take in four founding members of the Pacific Northwest’s “Ring of Fire.” Should the day be sunny, which is often the case in this area, be sure to pull over at the Cascade Volcanoes Viewpoint, located shortly outside of Goldendale. Showcasing one of the state’s most splendid vistas, this humble pull-over spot on the side of US-97 allows you to see, in one fell swoop, Mount Saint Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Adams and Mount Rainier. Granted, Hood and Adams clearly dominate the scene, but Saint Helens and Rainier nicely tip their caps on either side of this family picture. Don’t miss the chance to stand in awe of these magnificent mountains.

While the western names of these noble guardians of the Northwest have been in place since early, western exploration of the area, their original Native American names have been known for thousands of years:

  • Mount Adams Native American name: Pahto or Klickitat
  • Mount Hood Native American name: Wy’east or Wyeast
  • Mount Rainier Native American name: Tahoma or Takhoma
  • Mount St. Helens Native American name: Louwala-Clough or Loowit to the Klickitat

Continuing south on US-97 brings you up and over a ridge and down into the just-plain-amazing Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. I truly can’t say enough good about this area. It has mesmerized me my entire life and with each visit, I love and appreciate it all the more. Even if you are just passing through on your way to Oregon or beyond, it’s hard not to thoroughly admire nature’s handiwork as you descend into the gorge.

Travel Tip: If you’re pining to do a bicycle trip through the area, the Mt. Adams Bus – Mt. Adams Transportation Services (MATS) goes from Goldendale and all through the gorge. (It also goes over bridges to The Dalles and Hood River.) Put that bike on the rack and take a break from the uphill! $1 for adults and kids five and under are free. Sweet!

Should you indeed only be passing through, you can continue heading south on US-97 towards the nearby Sam Hill Memorial Bridge and into Oregon. A large truck-stop area, Biggs Junction, lies just past the bridge and continuing south will bring you to beautiful Bend, Oregon. Further south and into California, it is possible to hook up with I-5 in the city of Weed near Mount Shasta. (Travel bonus: If you were to reverse course on US-97 and head through Okanogan County and into British Columbia, Canada (BC Highway 97), you could drive all the way to Alaska via the ALCAN Highway. (#LifeGoals) US-97 in a pretty epic highway!

For this trip, however, my travels remained firmly in Washington as I followed along the path of the Lewis and Clark Expedition via SR-14 west. This natural wonder of an area features amazing history and spectacular geology, not to mention breathtaking views. Ice age flood plains, millennia-old Native American history, towering basalt cliffs and the mighty Columbia River are just a few of the attractions. It’s not hard to understand why the area has been a major hub of activity for thousands and thousands of years. It can also be a bit difficult to take it all in while simply driving along the winding road. Keep those eyes on the road while driving, but be sure to pull over many times along the way to revel in the fantastic scenery.

Columbia River Gorge
Yep. That’s a pretty amazing view.

Not too far into my journey on SR-14, I stopped for a visit at the lovely Maryhill State Park. A sprawling, scenic area along the Columbia, it’s a great spot for a picnic or camping adventure. Bring your boat and do some fishing or perhaps a little waterskiing. (I have the fondest memories of waterskiing on the Columbia. Major fuel for my I must have a boat plan…) On a windy day, it’s likely windsurfers will be also sailing the river and defying the laws of gravity. (Discover Pass required for parking and a Launch Permit is required for boating.)

Just up the road from the park sits one of the county’s, nay state’s, most interesting sites, the Stonehenge Memorial & Klickitat County Veterans Memorial. Designed by prolific highway builder, Sam Hill, it sits on a bluff overlooking the Columbia as a monument to soldiers killed in WWI. (Sam Hill was also a businessman, lawyer and railroad exec and quite influential to the area’s development in the early 1900s) While not quite Salisbury Plain, the view is stunning and the structure a truly unique tribute. Sam Hill’s crypt is located just a short walk below the monument on a bluff overlooking the river.

Additional unique and interesting spots to check out in the area:

  • In operation since 1936, the excellent Gunkel Orchards & Fruit Stand is just down the road from the Stonehenge memorial. Open seasonally, they offer delicious fresh fruit and more. Cherries, peaches, nectarines… Go get ‘em! (Monday – Thursday, 8am – 6pm and Friday – Sunday, 8am – 6pm)
  • Visit the Waving Tree Vineyard for a bit of wine tasting bliss. They’re located down from the memorial and east of the historic Maryhill Community Church (c.1888) on Maryhill Highway. They also have a tasting room at the entrance of Maryville State Park, but it is currently closed due to COVID. (Winery open daily from 10am – 5pm, but they do suggest making an appointment.)
  • The Maryhill Loops Road goes between US-97 (just past Goldendale) and connects with SR-14 near the Stonehenge Drive turn-off. Now only open to bikes and pedestrians, it is part of the original, ten-mile asphalt road Sam Hill personally financed in the early 1900s and is the first such road in the northwest. It was originally used it to experiment with paving techniques and also provided an invigorating drive for early motorists. (Pro Tip: They do open the road twice a year to motorists. Gotta check out those hairpin turns!)

Heading a little further west on SR-14 continues the celebration of Sam Hill and his significance to the region. Enter the fabulous Maryhill Museum, a crown jewel in the extraordinary beauty of the area. Built by Sam Hill, the name is a tribute to his wife, daughter and mother-in-law, all named “Mary” and the opening was dedicated by Queen Marie of Romania in 1926. Featuring an excellent art collection both in the galleries and throughout the grounds, it is a must-stop when visiting the area. It also offers a gorgeous, expansive view of the area’s amazing geology. (March 15th – November 15th, 10am – 5pm daily.)

Sam Hill’s Legacy: As he was an extensive international traveler, Sam Hill’s contributions extend beyond the area. He is also responsible for the Peace Arch monument in Blaine, between the US and Canadian border and built a golf course and restaurant at Semiahmoo, just north of Blaine. During Prohibition, the restaurant could serve alcohol as it was on the Canadian side. Well played, Sam. Well played. Additionally, if you’re in the Seattle area, take a drive through the neighborhood of the Sam Hill house, located on Capitol Hill.

After luxuriating in the artistic grandeur of Maryhill Museum, it was time to find a bit of lunch – and maybe do a little wine-tasting. (Art, food and wine… A perfect afternoon!) Located just west of the museum, off of SR-14, lives the wonderful Maryhill Winery. Featuring award-winning wine, a delicious menu and spectacular views, a visit to Maryhill Winery is always a good idea. Their famous amphitheater is unfortunately closed these days, but they do still feature live music on their lovely terrace. I’m pretty sure if I lived in the area, I’d be there all the time – for the charcuterie and Albariño alone! (Open daily, 11am – 6pm, 8pm on Saturdays. They also have tasting rooms in Spokane, Vancouver and Woodinville.)

One of the best sightseeing opportunities while traveling through Klickitat County is just that; seeing the sights. There are plenty of places to pull over and I highly recommend you take advantage and enjoy the many incredible vistas. The area is part of the greater Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail, which spans Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon and it is a marvel to take in. The entire “trail” spans 16,000 square miles!

Also found in the area is The Dalles Dam. (A great opportunity to do my classic Dam! joke. You are again welcome.) This area of the Columbia was forever altered by a different type of flooding in 1957 with the completion of the dam. Before this time, the massive Celilo Falls dominated the scene. These marvelous falls were a hugely important center of fishing, trade and gathering with neighboring tribes for thousands of years. They also proved to be a bit of an obstacle for the Lewis and Clark Expedition when it ventured through on its way to the Pacific. There is an excellent viewpoint located just before the turn-off to nearby Wishram which highlights the history of the area. It is well worth a stop.

Should you like to extend your area viewing with a nice glass of wine and tasty eats, the following Wishram establishments await your visit:

  • Set at the base of the Columbia Hills (elevation 2600-3200 feet) the Cascade Cliffs winery is a lovely place to enjoy a glass of wine. Bask in the sun, marvel at the nearby basalt cliffs and enjoy the view. Sigh…  The vineyard and tasting room is located just off of SR-14 and they also have tasting rooms in Hood River, Woodinville & Georgetown. (Wishram tasting room open daily, Noon – 7pm, Friday and Saturday to 8pm.)
  • In addition to a lovely wine offering, the Jacob Williams winery, located off SR-14 near the Avery Recreation Area, features charcuterie and other treats. Their tasting room is also dog friendly and features live music throughout the summer. (Open daily, 11am – 6pm. They also have a tasting room in McMinnville, OR.)

People have been inhabiting the Columbia River Gorge for millennia. There are many ways to explore and experience the history of the area, but among the most fascinating is the sprawling Columbia Hills Historical State Park along SR-14. (Discover Pass required for parking and launch permits required for boating) Comprised of four major areas with a wide variety of things to do and see. Whether your stay is short or long, it is impossible to walk away without being profoundly affected by the beauty and history of the area; So many stories, so many spectacular views, so many trails and natural wonders to savor.

One of the most amazing features of the area and easiest to check out are the ancient petroglyphs located along the Temani Pesh-wa Trail at Horsethief Lake. These amazing stories were left by the original stewards of the land and were relocated from their original locations along the Columbia with the creation of the Dalles Dam. Despite their move, it is still awe-inspiring to view them in their current dwelling and an enduring tribute to the indigenous peoples of the area.

There are so many wonderful opportunities for exploration in Columbia Hills Historical State Park. Just a few of the options:

  • For an easy-access look at the petroglyphs, drive to the riverside parking lot inside the Horsethief Lake entrance of the park. The Temani Pesh-wa Trail is located directly adjacent to the lot and features a boardwalk with a self-guided tour next to the petroglyphs. For something more in depth, the park offers ranger-guided tours which go deeper into the area and history. The featured She Who Watches tour tells the legend of a female chief of the native Wishram people from 3000 years ago. Check out local Native American artist, Lillian Pitt for wonderful artwork based on local legends and the Columbia River Gorge area.
  • Stay a while at Horsethief Lake and camp in the same areas that have been hosting travelers for millennia, including the Lewis and Clark Expedition. A couple of rustic cabins are also available for camping. The lake is usually open for fishing, from the end of April to October 31st and there is boating access to both the lake and Columbia River. (Permits required for fishing) If you don’t happen to have your own boat, check out the kayak and pedal boat rentals options.
  • For some stellar rock climbing, check out the Horsethief Butte area. Amazing views, beautiful trails and super cool rocks!
  • Off the north side of SR-14 lies the Crawford Oaks trailhead. In addition to hiking opportunities, bikes and horses have much to explore. If you’re looking for amazing mountain and gorge(ous) views, this is the trail to take.
  • Also off the north side of SR-14 and close to the Crawford Oaks trailhead, is the beautiful Dalles Mountain Ranch area. In addition to the 6,000 acres of remarkable landscapes, this historic ranch features much flora and fauna along with historic farm buildings and equipment.
  • Should you fancy a side trip into yonder Oregon, an amazing drive with incredible views can be found just over the nearby Dalles Bridge. Once across the bridge, take I-84 west and head for Mayer State Park. You’ll be looking for the Rowena Crest Viewpoint off the Historic Columbia River Highway. You won’t be sorry!

Important Public Service Announcement: The Columbia River Gorge is an extremely beautiful and fascinating area. It is one of many extremes, in fact; several of which being flora and fauna. Be on the lookout for rattlesnakes, ticks, poison oak and more! Spring is tick season and rattlesnakes generally love cool, concealed spots. Long pants, good boots and a hat are my go-to whenever hiking around these areas. Go prepared, be aware and you’ll be fine! And don’t go poking around in those interesting looking spots between the rocks… DON’T DO IT.

Nope.
And this is where my petroglyph party-train came to a halt…

After communing with the petroglyphs and successfully evading snakes, it was time to head further west. I was ultimately heading towards Trout Lake and Mount Adams, but there were many alluring spots to check out along the way. Beautiful trails, local history and delicious vino are just some of the options that came across my path in the Lyle area. Don’t miss exploring the beauty in and around this tiny community.

Keep an eye out for exits off of SR-14 for Old Highway 8. The area is a goldmine of outdoor opportunities and is not to be missed. Just a few of the amazing places to explore during your visit:

  • One of the most impressive features of the area (and that’s saying something!) can be found in the Coyote Wall Recreation Area. The Coyote Wall Trail is just one of the excellent ways to experience the mammoth formation of columnar basalt known as the Coyote Wall or “The Syncline.”
  • The Catherine Creek trailhead is lovely throughout the year; particularly during spring and early summer. The wildflowers are gorgeous and the views, sublime. Located off of Old Highway 8, west of the Syncline.
  • Located just off SR-14 at an intersection for Old Highway 8 sits Rowland Lake. (SR-14 actually cuts directly through the lake!) Known for its trout fishing, it’s a great spot to stop even if you’ve forgotten your poles.

More great opportunities for exploration in the Lyle area:

  • For wonderful views, wildflower identifying and a glance into the cherry-growing history of the area, hit up the Lyle Cherry Orchard Trail and Loop. The trailhead is located just off SR-14 and the trail itself can be enjoyed in a 5 to 6.5 round-trip loop.
  • Set in the center of town, the Lyle Twin Bridges Museum is a lovely place to learn about the history of the town and greater Lyle area. (Open Saturdays, June thru September, Noon to 5pm)
Chamberlain Lake
Lovely wildflowers in the Lyle area

If all that exploring has left you parched and peckish, there are several ways to address the situation while in the Lyle area:

  • A well-established and respected winery in the Columbia River Gorge, Domaine Pouillon offers a fine catalog of wines. Check out their summer ‘2nd Weekend Sip’ events for a taste of their greatness. (Located along the Lyle-Snowden Road. Tasting room currently open by appointment only.)
  • Stop in at the family-run Klickitat Canyon & Columbia Gorge Winery and enjoy a bit of their hand-processed, certified-organic wine. (Located along the Lyle-Snowden Road. Open Friday – Sunday, Noon – 6pm, Mother’s Day through Thanksgiving weekend and by appointment.)
  • I really enjoy the AGO Sauvignon Blanc from COR Cellars, located off of Old Highway 8. Stop in and give it a try, along with their other lovely offerings. Currently, tastings are by reservation only, Wednesday thru Monday. They have limited indoor seating in addition to a cool courtyard and tasting tent. Spots are available 11am thru 3pm.
  • Also found off of Old Highway 8, the appropriately named Syncline Winery features lovely wines in a beautiful location. This charming boutique winery is open for tastings Friday thru Sunday, noon to 5pm. (Reservations recommended) They also feature various tasting packages and I have to say I’m quite intrigued by their Blue Door Experience… Adding it to my travel bucket list!
  • Just up the road from the Syncline Winery is The Hillbilly Farm. This family-run farm stand features fresh produce with their specialties being tomatoes, watermelon and cantaloupe. They also have plants for sale and fresh eggs available 24 hours a day. Open daily, 9am – 7pm.
  • The tagline at Tetrahedron Wines is “Where Art meets Science,” which I find very cool. Two great tastes that go great together! Stop in for a tasting on Saturdays from noon to 5pm and Sundays from noon to 4pm. (Reservations recommended. Located off of SR-14 in downtown Lyle)
  • Featuring classic pub fare and hand-tossed pizza, The Sandbar and Grill is the perfect addition to a day of local exploration. Located off of SR-14 in downtown Lyle. Open Wednesday thru Saturday, 4pm – 9pm. (Closed Sunday – Tuesday)
  • If you’re in the mood for a classic country breakfast before you begin your adventures, stop in at the Country Café in downtown Lyle. They also serve old-school burgers and sandwiches during lunch. Open daily, 7am – 2pm. (8am on Sunday)
  • If all this adventuring has left you tuckered out, consider a reservation at The Lyle Hotel and take a well-earned rest. This quaint hotel (c. 1905) was originally a railroad hotel and offers a charming glimpse into the history of the Lyle area. Located in downtown Lyle. (Note: Their restaurant is closed for the time being.)
Twin Bridges Museum
The Twin Bridges Museum in Lyle

Getting to Lyle is simple via SR-14 as the highway goes directly through town. There are, however, a couple of interesting and less direct ways to and from the area. If the beauty of a Douglas fir forest is calling your name, take a 30-minute drive north to the tiny town of Snowden via the Lyle-Snowden Road. (West of downtown Lyle on SR-14, take Old Highway 8 to Canyon Road)

If you’d like to take a back-route to Lyle from the Goldendale area, hit up the very scenic SR-142. Along the way, make sure to visit the town and county namesake, Klickitat. This route is filled with plenty of beautiful views and vantages to discover. A great route extending from SR-142 is the Goldendale-Glenwood Highway, which leads north towards the Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge and offers more beautiful views and vantages.

While exploring the backroads and byways of Klickitat County, keep these enjoyable options in mind for your itinerary:

  • Located in Klickitat proper, the Klickitat Historical Museum features interesting exhibits and artifacts from days gone by. Open Sundays, 10am – 3pm from Memorial Day through Labor Day.
  • The town of Klickitat is located at the base of Klickitat Canyon. Spilling from its mouth at the base of Mount Adams, the Klickitat River flows into the canyon offering many outdoor opportunities along the way. (It’s the state’s longest wild river!) Fishing, rafting, hiking and much more can easily fill a sunny weekend. This is also apparently the place to be for turkey hunting. Chalk that up in the ‘you learn something new every day’ category for me. I was unaware Washington had a turkey population much less one large enough for hunting. The more you know!
  • If you’d rather draw pictures of turkeys than hunt them, consider instead hitting up the Klickitat Trail for a bit of hiking. This 31-mile trail follows an old railroad grade through the canyon and serves up much beauty and adventure. Bikes and horses welcome.
Hand Turkey
I spent a lot of time on this. You’re welcome. (Yes, Dad, that is a real googly eye.)

Further west of Lyle, heading towards Bingen, make sure to take a stop at the Chamberlain Lake Rest Area. (Even if you don’t need to rest. I mean, if you have a chance to rest, it’s probably a good idea. As my mom always said, you never know when your next chance might be…) This little spot is a great place to take a quick break and a short stroll around the area. Have a snack! The views are spectacular and it’s just off the road…  

There is much environmental variety to be found in Klickitat County. The bulk of my journey thus far has focused on the drier, Columbia River Gorge portion of the county. Beautiful grasslands, rolling hills and the Columbia River dominate the scene, but not far away exists a temperate rainforest. Heading north from Bingen and past White Salmon will take you into this amazing area. (Don’t worry – we’ll visit White Salmon and Bingen on the way home!)

From SR-14 in Bingen, I headed north on SR-141 towards White Salmon. The road immediately began climbing and the trees and greenery began to expand their reach. Mount Hood was towering behind me on the Oregon side and Mount Adams, straight ahead to the north. This was the first time I’d traveled this road, but I knew in my soul it was taking me somewhere spectacular. I was not proven wrong…

Ponderosa Pines
My favorite – the magnificent Ponderosa pine!

As I traveled further north on SR-141, I came to the tiny town known as the ‘gateway to Mount Adams,’ Trout Lake. (Not an actual lake, but there is a namesakelake nearby.) Since the arid Columbia River Gorge is a mere 30-minute drive from the cooler, greener mountain vibe of Trout Lake, the transition is quite something to experience. Even if the outdoor life isn’t your thing, it’s well worth just making a drive around the area to take in the beautiful scenery and environment.

Backroads tip: It is also possible to reach the Trout Lake area from Goldendale and SR-142 to the Glenwood and Trout Lake Highways OR the Glenwood Highway to BZ-Glenwood Highway. So many excellent backroads options!

In addition to stellar hiking, camping, fishing, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, climbing and rafting, the Gifford-Pinchot National Forest – Mount Adams area is also renowned for its scrumptious huckleberry season. The season goes from mid-August to mid-September and is a delicious way to experience the mountain scene.

Huckleberry hot tips: You will need a permit for picking in the Gifford-Pinchot National Forest. You can get a printable Free-Use Permit online if picking under one gallon/up to three gallons a year. If you’re wanting to pick to use for products such as jam, ice cream, etc. you’ll need a Charge Use Permit, available at your local Ranger District or Monument Headquarters

Should you not fancy cooking over a camp stove or camping under the stars, there are several lodging and dining options in Trout Lake. It is popular to use this area as a sort of basecamp for area adventures. Some great places to check out on your next visit:

  • Along with tasty food, the historic Trout Lake Country Inn also offers yoga classes in their dance hall and live music. Open Friday – Sunday, 5pm – 8:30pm.
  • The Station Café & Espresso at Andy’s Valley Service (and Chevron Station) features delicious huckleberry shakes and pies along with coffee, burgers and more! (And you can get gas and have your car serviced!)
  • On my recent visit, there were two old guys hanging out on the porch, discussing the day’s events. A little girl was playing on the steps… Take a step back to quieter times at the historic Trout Lake Grocery and stock up on adventure goods. If huckleberries are in season, check out the fresh berries, jams and more! (Open daily, 7:30am – 7pm.)
  • For pub fare in a classic, mountain setting, stop in at The Logs Inn and enjoy the scene. Located directly off of SR-141 and in the area since the 1930s, they have recently renovated and reopened in August 2020. They also have four cabins for rent. Open Wednesday – Friday, 3pm – 11pm and Saturday/Sunday, 11:30am – 11pm. (8pm on Sunday)
  • The very inviting, family-operated Trout Lake Valley Inn offers modern comfort in a beautiful, rustic setting. Be sure to check out the hot tub as well as the free bicycle and charcoal BBQ loaners! Pet friendly.
  • It’s right there in the name – cozy! The charming, family-operated Trout Lake Cozy Cabins feature modern amenities including Wi-Fi, TVs and outdoor BBQ grills. Roughing it, while not roughing it! Pet friendly.
  • If you’re looking for something truly unique for your Trout Lake stay, head to the Cave Creek Farm. This small herb farm also has cool “glamping” options as well as a farmhouse for rent.
  • For a more modern take on the mountain cabin, check out Getaway Mount Adams. Part of a larger, very cool “getaway” concept, these cabins have everything you need to get away from the city and into the outdoors; while still living in comfort.
Mt Adams
The stunning Mount Adams as seen from the Trout Lake area

One of the most uniquely beautiful and peaceful spots I’ve ever visited in Washington or beyond is located in the Trout Lake area. Resulting from the friendship between a Zen Buddhist monk and a Druid priest, the Trout Lake Abbey is like nothing I’ve ever encountered. The day I visited, I was the only one walking around the grounds and it was one of the most peaceful experiences I’ve had in my life. Granted, COVID likely had something to do with the lack of visitors, but I can’t deny the absolute bliss I enjoyed that afternoon.

Set on a large farm near the base of Mount Adams, the abbey features a Zen Buddhist temple and meditation garden, a Druid sanctuary, organic farm, lavender labyrinth and lodging. (Five private B&B style rooms and a hostel.) They host several retreats throughout the year including yoga, qigong, Chinese medicine, music and dance. Due to COVID, they are currently closed for overnight stays, but will hopefully be resuming lodging soon.

Whatever your ideology, go to this place. Walk around the grounds. Marvel in the peaceful feeling and sense that whoever you are, you are welcome. In these challenging times, it did my heart much good to feel such genuine goodwill – and in such a spectacular setting. I can’t wait for my next visit to the Abbey and hope I’ll be able to stay for longer than an afternoon.

The Gifford Pinchot National Forest is quite large and spans Skamania, Lewis, Yakima, Cowlitz and Klickitat counties. With such a large swath of forest as well as Mount Adams and Mount St. Helens located within its borders, the outdoor endeavors are near limitless. Camping and hiking are two of the most popular activities to add to any adventure and there are so many excellent options when visiting the Trout Lake area. A few ideas for you:

  • Part of a 2000-foot lava cave, the Guler Ice Caves feature a 650 ft long cavern for exploration. Leading down into total darkness, a 20-foot staircase leads you to a treasure trove of icy stalactites and stalagmites. Don’t forget your flashlight and jacket! Check out the Peterson Prairie Campground (summer to September 15th) if you’re interested in camping in the area. (Also great access to huckleberry picking!)
  • If you’re into lovely waterfalls, head to the trailhead for Langfield Falls. Enjoy the 60-foot falls and easy-going hike to get there. The trailhead is located about 25 miles northwest of Trout Lake.
  • If you’re looking for a spot for a nice, lakeside picnic, take the hike to lovely Lemei Lake, west of Trout Lake. (Five miles round-trip from the Cultus Creek Campground)
  • As a former fire lookout location, it makes sense that Sleeping Beauty Peak would offer stunning views and vistas. There is a small bit of elevation gain involved (1400 ft.), but the entire hike is only 2.6 miles round-trip. Not too bad for such amazing scenery! The nearby Trout Lake Creek Campground is a great campsite near the hike. (Trailers and RVs not recommended)
  • More great campsites in the area are the Goose Lake Campground (mid-June thru mid-September – RVs not recommended) and the Oklahoma Campground. (mid-May thru mid-September)

If you’re not afraid of a little snow (or a lot!), the cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and snow-shoeing trails in Gifford-Pinchot are quite impressive and abundant. Beautiful Douglas fir trees covered in snow and the quiet padding of snowshoes are two of my very favorite things. I highly recommend taking a trek into the Gifford-Pinchot forests during the winter season. (A Washington State Sno-Park Permit is required for sno-parks. Get the non-motorized permit for ski and snowshoe and the motorized for snowmobiling. The nearby Mt. Adams Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center in White Salmon sells non-motorized sno-park permits.)

If you love snowy adventures as much as I do, check out these spots in the Gifford-Pinchot area:

  • The Pineside Sno-Park is located north of Trout Lake and features 20-miles of groomed ski and snowshoe trails. (No snowmobiles allowed on the groomed trails.)
  • The SnowKing Sno-Park can be found a couple of miles beyond the Pineside Sno-Park. It offers both non-motorized and motorized access and features 20-miles of groomed cross-country trails and quite a bit of backcountry ski and snowmobile possibilities. (No groomed snowmobile trails.)
  • Found west of Trout Lake, the Atkisson Sno-Park is big with snowmobilers and offers 154-miles of marked snowmobile trails. There is also a large area of cross-country ski and snowshoe trails. (Marked, not groomed) The area is close to the Guler Ice Caves and Natural Bridges area and has a nice warming hut with wood stove.
  • If you didn’t bring your own gear, Doug’s Hood River and Pure Stoke Sports are great places to gear up. Offering both summer and winter rentals, they are located across the Columbia in lovely Hood River.

If you’d like to fine tune your snow skills, Mount Adams boasts an excellent climbing scene. It is the second highest peak in Washington (12,276 ft) behind Mount Rainier (14, 410 ft) and presents some excellent alpine climbing opportunities. While less technical than Rainier, it still requires an ice axe, crampons and a decent knowledge of mountaineering. If you are not an experienced climber, hire a guide or guide service. (Alpine Ascents or American Alpine Institute are great options) As the weather can change swiftly and dramatically, the Ten Essentials are incredibly important. Always be prepared.

If you’re just starting out in your alpine climbing career, the South Climb route is the “easiest.” It takes off from the South Climb Trailhead (also known as Cold Springs Camp) and can be achieved in a long day if prepared and in shape. That said, camping along the route is generally recommended. (Climbing permits for travel above elevation of 7000 ft. are required from May 1st to September 30th and can be purchased online. Late spring into early October is the typical climbing season.)

Snowshoeing
Snowshoeing is fun!

After cruising around the Trout Lake and Mount Adams area, it was time to head back towards White Salmon. I’d arranged to stay in town for the evening and was looking forward to investigating the downtown area and restaurant scene. A quick drive south on SR-141 brought me into town where I found parking directly in front of the Inn of the White Salmon, the hotel where I was staying. Score!

Once I’d checked in and briefly relaxed in my very comfortable and modern room, it was time to find some dinner. The inn was conveniently located on W. Jewett Boulevard, the main route through town and hot spot for restaurants, shops and more. Just a short walk down this very quaint road landed me directly in the center of town. The evening was coming on, but it was still warm and bright and the sky was just beginning to turn pink and orange with the sunset. Double score!

As White Salmon is a major hub of outdoor pursuits, the vibe around town is very casual and mountain-friendly. Don’t let that low-key vibe fool you, however, as there is a vibrant and delicious restaurant scene to be savored. From casual to fine dining, there are many excellent options, making it the perfect area to complete a day of mountain adventuring. Check out these tasty spots the next time you’re in town:

  • I had one of the best meals in a long time at the delicious Pixan Taqueria & Cantina. To say it was fantastic would be an understatement. I began with a tasty craft margarita paired with hand-cut chips served with house-made cheese, nasturtium leaves, honeycomb, cactus and house-made salsas and sauces. Just that was enough, but I wisely followed it up with a selection of tacos and additional chips, salsa and beer. It’s a good thing my hotel was a block away as I was moving pretty slowly… (Open Monday/Tuesday from 4-9pm, Friday from 4-10pm, Saturday from noon – 10pm and Sunday, noon – 9pm. Closed Wednesday/Thursday.)
  • Sporting an excellent ski theme, Le Doubblé Troubblé Wine Co. is a cool little tasting room in the heart of downtown. Monday and Thursday, Noon – 8pm, Friday – Sunday, Noon – 8pm. (Closed Tuesday/Wednesday)
  • In the mood for fried pickles and beer cheese soup? I know I always am! Everybody’s Brewing in the downtown area is a fun brewery and pub serving tasty beer and great food. Open Sunday/Monday, 11:30am – 9:30pm, Tuesday, 3:30pm – 9:30pm and 10pm on Friday/Saturday. (Closed Wednesday)
  • Serving freshly made bread and pastries along with breakfast and lunch sandwiches, the White Salmon Baking Co. can be found just off Jewett Boulevard. (Open Monday, 5pm – 8pm for pizza night, Wed – Sun, 8am – 3pm. Closed Tuesday.)
  • Henni’s Kitchen & Bar covers the refined dinner and cocktail scene in downtown White Salmon. Using locally-sourced ingredients, their menu pairs very well with a glass or two of local vino. (Open Thursday – Sunday, 5pm – 9pm)
  • Just next door to Henni’s, their sister restaurant Pizza Leona serves up delicious full pies and slices along with refreshing soft-serve ice cream. (Open daily, 4pm – 9pm)
  • The very hip Feast Market & Delicatessen is located in the center of down town and features prepared lunch and dinner options along with fresh meat and seafood, dairy and specialty items. (Open Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 8pm)
  • Locally-sourced ingredients make up the very tasty menu at the North Shore Café, located in the center of downtown. Serving breakfast, lunch, coffee, tea and more! (Open Friday – Wednesday, 8am – 2pm. Closed Thursdays.)
  • Located off SR-141, heading north towards Trout Lake, the Ruby June Inn & Icehouse Bar offers lodging along with a seasonal Chef’s Collective Dinner Series. Getting a ticket to one of these dinners is high on my bucket list for future visits to the White Salmon area.

In addition to the mighty Columbia, there are several other amazing rivers and creeks flowing through Klickitat County. There is also a lot of crazy wind to add to the adventure. Kayaking, rafting, windsurfing and simply relaxing on the water are just some of the ways to enjoy all the wet stuff. In addition to all the opportunity on the Columbia, there is quite a bit of action happening off of SR-141 in the White Salmon and Trout Lake areas. Considerations for your next water-loving adventure:

  • If whitewater isn’t your thing, keep it mellow with some hiking along the tree-lined creeks of the Jewett Creek Watershed Recreation Area. In addition to hiking, they also feature a BMX bike park and mountain biking trails.
  • The beautiful White Salmon River flows into the Columbia at this point. If you’re a little brave and maybe a little crazy, consider rafting over Husum Falls near BZ Corner. Husum Falls is the tallest commercially rafted waterfall route in the country. Should this sound like the trip for you, hit up local guide services Zoller’s Outdoor Odysseys or Wet Planet Rafting & Kayaking for their excellent guided river trips. (Absolutely on my bucket list for future visits! Maybe not those falls, though…)
  • In need of gear for your crazy, water-filled adventure? Stop in at Immersion Research in White Salmon for some outfitting assistance. (Open daily, 9am – 5pm)
  • Perhaps you’d like to sail over the water rather than through it. Should this be the case, head to Pacific Boardsports / Naish USA for all your windsurfing needs. (Open Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm)

After I begrudgingly wrapped up my visit to White Salmon, it was time to head home. And back to ye ol’ day job… (I’ll be back soon, White Salmon. I’ll be back!) But since I wasn’t fully committed to making it back in time for my afternoon meeting, I thought I’d check out nearby Bingen and maybe grab a little coffee and breakfast on the way home. A girl’s gotta eat, after all! It was also a gorgeous, sunny morning and I knew from my phone’s weather app it was raining at home… Let’s go get some coffee!

Located on SR-14 and along the Columbia, Bingen holds the keys to much enjoyment and adventure. Beautiful forests are just to the north and one of the country’s most prolific rivers, directly adjacent. It is also very close to the Hood River Bridge and provides easy access to the town of Hood River and Oregon at large. Bingen is a great center of activity and there are many pastimes to pursue while visiting the area; water sports, wine-tasting and sightseeing to name a few.

The Columbia Gorge is a natural wind tunnel and epicenter of windsurfing and all things wind-sporty. If you’d like to try your hand at mastering the winds, these establishments can help you on your way:

  • Just across the bridge in Hood River, both Cascade Kiteboarding (daily 9-5) and Big Winds (daily 10-5) offer rentals, gear for purchase and various wind-worshipping lessons. Kiteboarding, windsurfing, and wing-foiling are a few of their daredevil options.
  • Perhaps you have your own boat or maybe a couple of jet skis, in which case, can I join you on your next trip? We’ll hit up Bingen Harbor and put in at the Bingen Marina. An afternoon of cruising around the Columbia, busting out some waterskiing and windsurfing? (The windsurfing is on you. I’m sticking with water skis.) This is a doable and excellent plan, right??
Mt Hood
Heading out of White Salmon and towards the windy Columbia and Mt. Hood

Unfortunately, I didn’t get much opportunity to investigate the Bingen restaurant scene on my recent visit. (Or go waterskiing!) I will, however, be back very soon and have a few establishments front-loaded on my list:

  • Who doesn’t love a good cup of Joe and a hand pie for breakfast? (or any meal, really) Located in the downtown area, directly on SR-14, Mugs Coffee, serves tasty beverages, pastries, sandwiches and more in a cozy atmosphere. I particularly enjoyed the sausage and egg hand pie. Mmmm!! (Open Monday – Thursday, 6:30am – 4pm, Friday to 3pm and Saturday from 7am – 2pm. Closed Sunday.)
  • Featuring gluten-free baked goods, including hand pies, cakes and pizza crusts, the Columbia Gorge Bakery is very popular throughout the area. They also offer frozen and take-n-bake options. (Open daily at 8am, Sunday at 10am.)
  • If you’re in the mood for Italian, Beneventi’s, located in the heart of downtown is the place to be. Serving pizza, sandwiches, pasta, calzones and more, they are open Monday thru Saturday from 10:30am – 8pm. (Closed Sunday.)
  • Located directly on SR-14 in the downtown area, the appropriately named EAT 14 can help you with that teriyaki and sushi craving. They also have burgers and fries! Open daily, 10:30am – 9pm. (Closed Sunday.)
  • Looking for pub food and BBQ in an old-school tavern scene? Head to Chips Bar & Grill on SR-14 in the downtown area for a drink and tasty food. (Currently undergoing new management and staffing – they hope to reopen soon.)
  • Operating in the area since 1867, the Dickey Farms Produce Market features all things local and fresh. (Including beer and ice cream!) They’re open Monday – Friday, 6am – 7pm (Saturday at 7am, Sunday at 10am)

In addition to river activities, Bingen has many options that don’t require a life vest. If you’re not looking to spend the day on your boat, consider these options: (Also, can I borrow your boat?)

  • Learn all about the greater Bingen area at the Gorge Heritage Museum, located in downtown Bingen. They are open from June 4th – August 31st on Fridays and Saturdays from noon to 4pm.
  • Located in the center of downtown, directly on SR-14, Antiques & Oddities is chock full of odds and ends from days gone by. I was in the area fairly early on my last visit and they weren’t open yet, but I’ll be back! Open daily from 10am – 4pm.
  • A performing arts center featuring live performances and theatre events, the Bingen Theater in downtown is a mainstay of local entertainment. They weren’t operating during COVID, but keep an eye on their website for upcoming events.
  • The Society Hotel looks very cool and I plan to stay there sometime soon. A converted schoolhouse featuring lodging in rooms, bunks and cabins, they also have a spa and bathhouse along with a cozy café and bar. (They also have a pretty cool looking location in downtown Portland.)
  • If you’re looking for local history and charm, check out the historic Joslyn House B&B in downtown Bingen. The oldest house in the Columbia Gorge, (c. 1860) the Joslyn House features multiple rooms with en suite bathrooms.
  • Bonus trip: The historic Columbia Gorge Hotel, located just across the bridge in Hood River is an absolutely beautiful hotel and spa – and it’s haunted! (So they say, but I didn’t see any ghostly visages during my Halloween stay.) Delicious dining, well-appointed rooms, beautiful grounds and a spectacular view of the Gorge – you can’t go wrong!

Since that afternoon meeting of mine was still looming in the distance, it was time to make my way back to the Seattle area. Goodbye enduring sunshine, gorgeous gorge views and towering mountains. Granted, I enjoy most of those things in greater Seattle (minus that whole enduring sunshine bit), but there’s just something so magical and unique about the way Klickitat County does it.

Since I was pressed for time and didn’t want to chance getting stuck in Portland area traffic, I decided to head back towards Goldendale on SR-14 and back out to US-97. Heading west on I-90 towards Seattle just felt like a better option overI-5 on a busy weekday morning. I ended up being very glad of that choice, even considering the never-ending construction on I-90.  

If you have a little more time on your hands, there are a few more ways to return to western Washington (should that be your destination) and some nice side-trips to enjoy along the way:

  • From Bingen and SR-14 take the Hood River Bridge (toll bridge) to I-84 West to Hood River and Portland. Get onI-5 in Portland and head back to the Seattle area. (Toll note: If you aren’t signed up with the BreezeBy toll-pay system, you can pay cash – or online within 7 days if you don’t have cash.)
  • From Bingen, head towards Skamania County on SR-14 and then I-205 towards Five Corners. (a suburb of Vancouver) Take I-5 towards Seattle and beyond. (Bonus trip: Located along SR-14, Beacon Rock State Park is a wonderful area to explore. Overlooking the Columbia River Gorge, this extinct volcano and surrounding area features great hiking, camping, boating and more. The switchback-filled hike to the top of Beacon Rock is an absolute must. (848-ft) Lewis and Clark camped here on their journey – both ways! (I will be covering this area further in my upcoming Skamania County article.)
  • Another great bonus trip while in the Skamania County area takes you to Oregon via I-84 and the Bridge of the Gods toll bridge. Once in Oregon, head for glorious Multnomah Falls and enjoy one of the Northwest’s most photographed and recognizable falls. To get back to the Seattle area from Multnomah Falls, go west on I-84 to I-205 or I-5 in Portland.
STOP
STOP. Stop and look at Mt. Hood before you go.

Well, I guess that wraps up my journey to Klickitat County. This version, anyway… There is so much to see and do in the area and so many opportunities for adventure packed into this relatively small county. I’ve visited several times in the past and I will definitely return many more times in the future. I can’t quit you, Klickitat County! I hope you will join me in appreciating this amazing part of Washington on one of your next adventures.

Until next time – happy trails!

California Poppy
Beautiful California Poppy on the Temani Pesh-wa Petroglyph Trail at Horsethief Butte

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Enjoy the scenery with my Klickitat County SPOTIFY PLAYLIST!

  • Feels Like Lightning – Josh Ritter (from Gathering)
  • Moon in the Water – Dawes (from Nothing is Wrong)
  • A Horse with No Name – America (from America)
  • Miles Away – Josh Ritter (from See Here, I have Built You A Mansion)
  • Wide Open Spaces – The Chicks (from Wide Open Spaces)
  • Only Prettier – Miranda Lambert (from Revolution)
  • Getting Ready to Get Down – Josh Ritter (from Sermon on the Rocks)
  • Newton’s Cradle – Sean Rowe (from New Lore)
  • Lonely Alone – Sheryl Crow, Willie Nelson (from Threads)
  • Ticks – Brad Paisley (from 5th Gear)
  • Sin Wagon – The Chicks (from Fly)
  • Lonesome Town – Ricky Nelson (from Ricky Sings Again)
  • Life Is Beautiful – Keb’ Mo’ (from Just Like You/Suitcase)
  • Horse’s Mouth – Edie Brickell & New Bohemians (from Hunter and the Dog Star)
  • Beautiful World – Colin Hay (from Going Somewhere)
  • Dear Someone – Gillian Welch (from Time (The Revelator))
  • I Only Want to Be with You – Shelby Lynne (from Just A Little Lovin’)
  • World Spins Madly On – The Weepies, Deb Talan, Steven Tannen (from Say I Am You)
  • Wildflowers (Home Recording) – Tom Petty (from Wildflowers & All the Rest)
  • Travelers Paradise – The Cactus Blossoms (from You’re Dreaming)
  • Back in Your Own Backyard – William Galison & Madeline Peyroux (from Got You on My Mind)
  • The Life You Choose – Jason Isbell (from Something More Than Free)
  • Got a Lotta Love – The Cactus Blossoms (from Easy Way)
  • Bluebird – Jamestown Revival (from A Field Guide to Loneliness)
  • No Hard Feelings – The Avett Brothers (from True Sadness)
  • Mr. Policeman – Brad Paisley (from 5th Gear)
  • Baby Snakes  – Frank Zappa (from Sheik Yerbouti)
Free Range
Full-on free range!

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Check out more I Ate the State Adventures:

I Ate the State – Pacific County

Welcome back! It’s been far too long… I know we’re not running at full-capacity yet, in so many ways, but it feels like things are starting to look up again. Similar to spring flowers seeking the sun, I feel us starting to stretch our limbs, looking hopefully to the parting clouds. And to perhaps begin thinking about adventuring beyond our neighborhoods again…

It’s been an incredibly challenging time for the world – and it’s not over. There has been much loss, heartbreak and discord, but there has also been hope – and it’s growing. Neighbors have reached out to each other. Local businesses have done their best, against great hardship, to continue to serve their communities. The medical community, scientists, teachers, grocery store workers, restaurant staff, postal workers… SO many heroes have worked tirelessly to keep us safe, nourished and healthy. 

I actually visited Pacific County and started writing this article a little over a year ago, just before we all went into hibernation. I have very recently returned to Pacific County and have to say it was amazing. Yes, masks, outdoor dining and social distancing were definitely in rightful play, but to be able to walk along the beach and gaze out at the ocean was so very welcome and rejuvenating.

Aside from masked visits to local shops and take-away from local restaurants, I’ve been pretty sequestered within my two-bedroom apartment for the past year. Granted, I am incredibly grateful to have been able to work from home, but I’m looking forward to a time when a trip to the grocery store isn’t my big social outing. I’m excited to hang out with my friends and family somewhere other than on a Zoom call. I’m dreaming of seeing someone smile at me and being able to smile back, unmasked. I’m looking forward to hugs…

I know many of these cherished activities will be making a comeback, but in the meantime, I plan to continue to mask up, frequently wash my hands and do my best to be respectful and thankful to everyone who is working so hard to bring us back to some point of normalcy. We are all in this together and will persevere only by working together, respecting one another and honoring all of the hard work of our heroes.

COVID-19 Travel Advisory: Please review COVID-19 alerts and regulations ahead of your travels. Refer to CDC guidelines along with local and state guidelines and wear a mask whenever suggested or required.

Me and Sporty Spice, enjoying the sunset on Long Beach

And now, without further ado, onward to beautiful Pacific County!

There are very few beaches on the planet long enough and wide enough to easily accommodate beach-combing, horseback riding and an actual state (sand) highway, but Pacific County in southwestern Washington covers the bill. Add in shorelines brimming with some of the country’s most delicious seafood, lovely coastal wetlands and sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and you won’t want to leave. Pacific County is a veritable treasure trove of delicious fare and unique adventure opportunities.

Established as one of the state’s oldest counties in 1851 and integral to Native American life for millennia prior, Pacific County holds a key place in the development of the United States. It was at Cape Disappointment, where the mighty Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean, the Lewis and Clark Expedition finally completed its mission in the fall of 1805. Originally part of the Oregon Territory, Pacific County found itself carved out of nearby Lewis County to officially become part of the Washington Territory. Even though it maintains a relatively small population in present day, the impact and continuing contributions of this tiny county cannot be underestimated in the grand scheme of the present-day United States.

While Pacific County is somewhat tucked away along the southwestern coast of the state, it is still fairly accessible. The route I typically favor takes me south on I-5 to US-101 (Exit 104, in Olympia) and on towards Aberdeen in Grays Harbor County via SR-8 and US-12. Once in Aberdeen, I head further southwest on SR-105 towards Grayland and North Cove. (With stops at Westport Winery and Cranberry Road Winery on the way out of Grays Harbor County. I mean, they’re right there, conveniently along the way…)

In general, I-5 accommodates the main arterials into Pacific County. It’s possible to hook up with US-101 further north near Olympic National Park and enjoy a beautiful drive down the coast. (All the way into the Los Angeles area, in fact!) Additional routes off of I-5 include US-12 (Exit 88 near Tenino), SR-6 (Exit 77 in Chehalis) and SR-4 (Exit 40 in Kelso). Any route you choose will inevitably feature mile after mile of beautiful scenery as you make your way to the coast. You can’t go wrong!

Driving south along SR-105 is an excellent example of the extensive, beautiful scenery, but as every rose has its thorn, the Pacific County coast has its battle with erosion. Portions of SR-105 have had to be relocated further inland over the years, along with many residences, buildings and a lighthouse being lost to the encroaching waters. It is quite appropriate the area has earned the nickname of Washaway Beach. The erosion is particularly visible driving through the North Cove area where the tiny North Cove Pioneer Cemetery had to be moved across the highway in 1977 due to erosion.

Not too far past North Cove on SR-105 is the exit to Tokeland Road and its namesake, the coastal community of Tokeland. Named for Chief Toke, the area maintains its strong connection to the Shoalwater Bay Tribe. A few miles down Tokeland Road, the Shoalwater Bay Casino (Daily, 10am – 12am; 2am Friday/Saturday) greets visitors with food and gaming as well as lodging at the adjacent Tradewinds on the Bay. Directly across the street lie more food options at the North Cove Bar & Grill (Currently Friday – Sunday, noon – 8pm; 7pm on Sunday) along with gas, food and conveniences at Georgetown Gas Station.

One place not to miss in the Tokeland area is the historic Tokeland Hotel and Restaurant. (On the National Register of Historic Places) Built in 1885 and the oldest hotel in the state, they regularly feature events such as Clam Jam, Oysterfest, Tokefest and more. In early May, along with local galleries and businesses, they host the popular Tokeland North Cove Art Studio Tour. Many of the local events were cancelled in 2020 due to COVID-19, but will hopefully return in 2021. (Note: The Tokeland Hotel is reopening 6/1/21. Restaurant currently open for take-out, Friday – Sunday, 4-6pm.)

Situated on Willapa Bay, Tokeland is well-known for its contribution to the country’s seafood supply. Nearby Nelson Crab Inc. was in fact the first cannery on the west coast to can crab beginning in 1934 and continues the practice today. Operating out of a new building at the Port of Willapa Harbor and Tokeland Marina, they also feature a seafood counter, coffee service, ample seating and a fun gift shop featuring local artists and goods. (Daily, 9am – 5pm) If you happen to arrive via boat, public moorage is available as well as a RV park and boat ramp – and you can throw your own crab pots off of the public fishing pier!

Back on SR-105, my next destination was Raymond, the largest town in Pacific County. Along the way, I was drawn in by the beautiful scenery of the Smith Creek State Wildlife Recreation Area. Located across the bay from Tokeland, the area sports beautiful views and sweeping wetlands with great fishing and bird-watching opportunities. I was truly mesmerized by the views looking out over Willapa Bay and very glad I made time to take in the scene. 

While Raymond holds court as Pacific County’s largest town, it maintains a very homey, small-town vibe. Nestled just inland of Willapa Bay on the Willapa River, it enjoys rolling foothills as well as the coastal flavor of nearby waterways. When driving around the Raymond area, keep an eye out for the many steel statues along US-101, SR-6 and strategically placed throughout town. Made to depict local wildlife and Raymond residents, some of them are strikingly life-like; especially as seen around dusk. (I could’ve sworn those deer were real!)

Historically known for its lumber industry, Raymond also has an interesting artistic past. Northwest grunge gods, Nirvana, played their first gig at a Raymond house party in 1987. Additionally, my very favorite holiday tune, The Christmas Song (Chestnuts roasting on An Open Fire) was co-written by Raymond-born, award-winning composer, writer and producer, Robert Wells along with prolific musician, Mel Tormé. That’s a pretty eclectic and cool mash-up of musical history!

On your next visit to Raymond, take a little time to explore the continuing artistic legacy of the area as well as the beauty of its surroundings:

  • Learn more about Raymond’s history and the popular mode of transportation of days gone by at the well-curated Northwest Carriage Museum. (Open daily, 10am – 4pm) Don’t miss experiencing Raymond’s history of seafaring transportation at the Willapa Seaport Museum located directly next door. (Closed Sunday/Monday) And top it off with a stop at the Willapa Bay Public Market for unique finds from local artisans. (Friday/Saturday, 10am – 4pm)
  • Included on the National Register of Historic Places, the lovely Raymond Theater (c. 1928) is still entertaining Raymond residents and features local theater as well as live music and movies. Just down the street and also listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Tudor-style Raymond Timberland Library (c. 1929) is a charming part of the downtown core and a great place to relax with good book.
  • The Raymond area is filled with beautiful river viewing opportunities and the Willapa Hills Trail is an excellent way to enjoy the scene. (Hook up with the 56-mile trail at Riverfront Park near the Northwest Carriage Museum) If you’re up for a bit of kayaking or paddle-boarding action, hit up local Willapa Paddle Adventures for Willapa River escapades. Or shenanigans. Your call.

After your Raymond adventuring, check out the local foodie scene and refuel for continuing exploration. A few ideas to get you started:

  • Not only can you grab a tasty burger and brew – or an insane bloody Mary – at Pitchwood Inn & Alehouse, they also have cozy rooms should you like to extend your Raymond exploits. (Alehouse open from noon to 9pm, 11pm on Friday/Saturday, 8pm on Sunday. Closed Mondays)
  • Featuring classic diner fare along with specialties like their stuffed sandwiches and fresh Willapa Bay oysters, Slater’s Diner is a great local mainstay. (Monday – Thursday, 11am – 7pm, 8pm Friday/Saturday. Noon to 7pm on Sunday)
  • Poutine, tots, brats, hand-dipped corndogs, beer and mead? What?? I’m in! I didn’t get a chance to stop at Wildman Brewing Company, but I’m making a point to visit on my next trip. (Family friendly. Open Tuesday – Thursday, 4pm – 8pm, 9pm on Friday. 11am – 9pm on Saturday, 7pm on Sunday. Closed Mondays.)
  • Drinking delicious wine often makes me say “WooHoo!” so it only seems appropriate a winery should make it their namesake. Check out WooHoo Winery for delicious wine and be sure to try their seasonal Glühwein. (Open Saturdays Noon – 6pm. They also have a tasting room in Leavenworth open Friday – Sunday)
  • If you’re visiting during a summer weekend, head to Smith Creek Blueberry Farm and stock up on u-pick blueberries. (Mmmm… Now I want blueberry pie…) Another great summer event in late August can be found just east on SR-6 in Menlo. Head to the Pacific County Fairgrounds and enjoy all manner of crazy fair food, goods and specialties from all around Pacific County and more. (Hopefully returning in August 2021)

From Raymond, it’s easy to travel southeast on SR-6 to meet back up with I-5 in the Chehalis area in Lewis County. There are a few tiny towns to drive through along the way, but it won’t take long before you meet up with Western Washington’s main arterial. On this journey, however, I chose to hook up with US-101 to head south towards the nearby town of South Bend.  

Billed as the Oyster Capital of the World and now serving as the county seat, South Bend provides 25% of the nation’s oyster harvest out of adjacent Willapa Bay. Oysterville originally served as the county seat until 1893 when disgruntled South Bend residents navigated steam boats up Willapa Bay and absconded with the county records. The pirated records were then relocated to South Bend where they have remained ever since. The scandal! 

For the scoop on Pacific County’s interesting past, stop in at the Pacific County Heritage Museum, located directly off of US-101 in downtown South Bend. (11am – 4pm, March through September and 12pm to 3pm during the winter months.) For more Pacific County information, pay a visit to the historic Pacific County Courthouse and take in the beautiful art glass dome. (c. 1910 and on the National Register of Historic Places)

Even if you are not a lover of oysters, there are many fine meals to be found in South Bend. The scene is a little quieter during the winter months, but there are always great dining options to explore.

  • Head to the casual River View Dining for a nice view of the Willapa River and great food. They do feature the local hero, the Goose Point oyster, but don’t miss their fish-n-chips and burgers. (11am – 8pm daily, 11:30 on Sunday. Closed Mondays.)
  • Oysters are in the name at the Chester Club & Oyster Bar and they represent them well, but they also have several other great dishes on the menu and regularly feature live music. (Daily, 10am – 2am)
  • Take your German specialties to go or grab a spot in the cozy seating area, but do make a stop at Jayden’s German Store & Deli. Featuring a great selection of European sweets, meats and more, they most importantly carry an impressive selection of goods from Germany. Mmmm… (Open daily, 11am – 5pm, 6pm on Friday/Saturday)
  • Newer to the South Bend foodie scene and offering great brew along with hand-tossed pizza and fresh oysters, the Willapa Brewing Company is an excellent addition to the South Bend scene. Check out the Bone River Oyster Stout – made with fresh oysters! (Open daily, noon – 7pm, 8pm on Friday/Saturday. Closed Tuesdays.)
  • I don’t think they have any drinks made with oysters, but you never know. For great, non-oysterfied coffee and beverages, stop in at Elixir Coffee and enjoy a drink, a great river view and something from their tasty menu. (The turmeric latte was particularly lovely! (Daily, 7am – 6pm) In addition to coffee, they also feature event catering and a nice array of handcrafted goods. After enjoying your coffee, stop in at Riverside Gallery next door and enjoy a bit of local artistry and design. (10:30am – 4:30pm, Thursday – Sunday. Closed Monday – Wednesday.)

While it’s possible to get to South Bend via the Willapa Hills Trail from Raymond, I chose to go with four wheels for this adventure. Granted, one might miss a bit in passing, but when there are delicious oyster spots to try and beautiful coastlines to explore, it seems a fair trade-off. Continuing past South Bend on US-101 will definitely lead you to great bounty on both counts. It is a stunning drive filled with twists, turns and gorgeous sloughs and not to be missed. (It also would be pretty amazing on a motorcycle!)

As you get closer towards the coast, you’ll pass through the Bone River Natural Area Preserve and Niawiakum River Natural Area Preserve. Both are protected for their coastal salt marshes, various species of birds and mammals as well as freshwater streams, wetlands and forested areas. If you’re feeling particularly adventurous, consider a kayak trip up the Bone River. The Bone River Launch in the nearby Bay Center peninsula area is a popular place to put in. Definitely a bucket list item for a future adventure…

Also located in the Bay Center area and an excellent place to stop for an oyster pilgrimage is the iconic Goose Point Shellfish Farm & Oystery. (Open Friday – Sunday, 10am – 4pm; 5pm during winter) They offer fresh oysters and shellfish to go as well as oysters to enjoy in their picnic area. Grab a round of oysters and a Bone River Oyster Stout and enjoy the Willapa River scene. (They partnered with Willapa Brewing Company in nearby South Bend on the stout.) If you can’t get enough of the oysters – or that very unique stout – consider pitching a tent at nearby Bush Pioneer County Park and making a weekend of it. (Located on the very tip of the Bay Center peninsula and part of the Chinook Nation, where even more oysters can be found close by at the Ekone Oyster Company. Check out their online shop.)

The next stops on my itinerary were two of my very favorite spots in the state, Long Beach and Cape Disappointment. Along the way, however, were some excellent distractions and beautiful areas to explore. Not only is the drive spectacular all on its own, there are many breathtaking spots along the way to stop and commune with nature. If camping, hiking, fishing or just standing still and taking in the scene are your jam, this is the place to be. Just a few of the wonderful options to enjoy on your next Pacific County outing:

  • Out of the Bay Center area, head south on US-101 through the Nemah and Middle Nemah areas towards the gorgeous Willapa National Wildlife Refuge and Long Island coastal areas. The only way to visit Long Island is via private boat, but the bounty is worth it. Shellfish harvesting, hiking, camping and more await you on the island. Long Island has long been a home and point of resource for native tribes and is still used for cultural and spiritual occasions. Be sure to check out the Cedar Grove Trail which features trees over 900 years old. For hiking off-island, check out the Willapa Art Trail and Cutthroat Climb for relatively easy family hikes on a lovely boardwalk through the refuge. (Located at Milepost 24 on US-101. There is also a boat launch for Long Island in this area, across US-101 from the Milepost 24 refuge entrance.)
  • A great way to immerse oneself in the area is with a visit to the Wings Over Willapa festival in the fall. (September 23-26, 2021) It features tours, workshops and classes covering birding, art and a lecture series about the ecology, management and history of Willapa Bay.

Continuing southwest on US-101 will eventually bring you to a junction with SR-103 in the Seaview area. Congratulations – You’ve made it to the Pacific Ocean! And you didn’t have to travel for thousands of miles via horse, wagon or canoe to do it. Thank you, Lewis and Clark!

At this fork in the road, you can opt to go right and head into the bustling town of Long Beach or take a left and head towards Ilwaco and the epic Cape Disappointment. They’re both must-sea destinations and in easy reach of one another. However, since I was in need of some beach action and maybe a tasty treat, I took a right and headed into Seaview and Long Beach, located along the Long Beach Peninsula. We’ll head back towards Cape Disappointment shortly. No need for disappointment…

Before arriving in Long Beach proper, the lovely Seaview area offers several lodging and dining options for the peninsula visitor. Long Beach can get fairly crowded during the summer months and historic Seaview is nice if you’re looking for a little respite. A few spots to explore on your next adventure:

  • If you’re in need of a tasty, local brew, check out North Jetty Brewing for beer, light snacks and maybe even a bit of Bingo. I’m not a huge sour beer fan, but I truly loved their Yara Peach-Passion-fruit Sour as well as their super-drinkable Beach Beer Blonde Ale. They will even fill to-go cans! (Kid friendly (to 6pm), open daily at noon – Closed Tuesdays)
  • Visit local favorite, The Depot Restaurant for delicious farm and ocean-to-table fare served out of the historic Seaview train depot building. (c. 1900) (Open daily, 4:30 – 8:30pm)
  • A stop at the quaint 42nd Street Café & Bistro will yield a hearty breakfast or lunch and tasty bistro fare during the dinner hour. (8am – 12:30pm, 4:30 – 8pm for dinner. Closed Monday/Tuesday.)
  • For the ultimate in hip getaways, check out the historic Sou’Wester Lodge. Stay in the original lodge (c. 1892) or kick back in the adjacent vintage travel trailer resort, cabins or campsite. In addition to cool lodging, they also host various classes, wellness events, live music and artist residencies. Relax further in their Garden Spa and Finnish sauna and check out the goods in at the store in the vintage trailer. 
  • The historic Shelburne Hotel (c. 1896), along with its onsite restaurant and pub, offer trendy lodging, menus and cocktails in a vintage locale. The best of both worlds. (Pub open daily, Noon – 1pm, Monday – Thursday, 11pm on Friday; 8am – 10pm Saturday, 11pm on Sunday.)
  • For an up close and personal look at the history of Seaview, check out the Seaview Walking Tour and enjoy strolling by charming Seaview homes, lodging and more.

Is it maybe a little scary? Yes. Perhaps a little dangerous? Yes. Is it spectacularly beautiful, absolutely unique and full of cool travel cred? Yes, yes and YES! Welcome to Long Beach and the “World’s Longest Beach.” (Drivable. On a peninsula.) The world’s longest beach is actually Praia do Cassino in Brazil with a few beaches in other countries also being longer. But they’re not taking down the sign, so let’s just all be cool…

The scary and potentially dangerous parts come in the form of driving on the 28-mile beach, which is technically considered a state highway. (25 mph. Keep to the right and don’t drive on the dry sand! Seriously.) Of the 28-miles, there are sections closed to vehicles year-round as well areas closed seasonally to vehicles during razor clam season. Follow the general rules-of-the-road in addition to not driving on sand dunes and paying attention to the tides. Check out the Beach Safety and Rules for more information and tips.

If four-wheels on the beach aren’t for you, there are countless other ways to enjoy the day and Long Beach has quite a bit of beach to enjoy. Just a few of the excellent activities to explore during your next beach getaway:

  • Razor clam digging is very popular on Long Beach. Visit the WDFW site for dates, beaches, regulations and more – And don’t forget to procure a Shellfish & Seaweed License before you start digging. They can be purchased online or at one of many local area stores.
  • Horseback riding on the beach is a top item on my Washington State bucket list and my dream shall be realized soon – I know it! Riders can bring their own horses or hit up the outfits offering beach rides. Check out West Coast Horse Rides and The Long Beach Horse Rides for both guided and unguided rides (for the experienced riders) on the beach and the Red Barn Arena and Peninsula Saddle Club for options when bringing your own horses.
  • For an excellent day at the beach and a good bit of exercise, hit up the Lewis & Clark Discovery Trail. The trail goes all the way to Ilwaco and Cape Disappointment State Park (8.5 miles one-way) and offers amazing views along the way. Be sure to visit the Long Beach Boardwalk and don’t miss the wooden whale sculptures near the Sid Snyder beach entrance.
  • It might not be Oahu’s North Shore, but you can still get your surf on in the Long Beach area. Head to Skookum Surf Company for gear, instruction and information on the local hot spots.
  • Long Beach takes kite flying to the next level. Bust out your old school diamond kite or grab the newest in kite technology from one of the many local kite shops. Be sure to visit the World Kite Museum near the beach to take in the majesty of riding the breeze and head to the Washington State International Kite Festival for even more majesty.(August 16-22, 2021)

Important note for any beach outing: Never turn your back on the wily ocean. Sneaker waves are REAL.

There are many great places to eat and stay while visiting the Long Beach area. Whether it’s a beach snack, casual meal or fine dining, Long Beach has you covered. There really is nothing finer than picnicking at the beach on a warm, sunny day. Or grabbing an ice cream cone and walking along the boardwalk. (But don’t count out those stormy beach days!)

The next time you’re in Long Beach, keep these excellent establishments in mind:

  • The Adrift Distillers (daily, 11am – 5pm) feature delicious spirits and tastings and the adjacent Adrift Hotel features onsite dining at the very hip Pickled Fish restaurant. (Daily, 8am – 10pm; 11pm, Friday/Saturday) Excellent food, cocktails and beach-side lodging in a trendy locale – Score! Reservations recommended for the Pickled Fish. I highly recommend the burrata salad, Dungeness crab cakes and vanilla Pavlova – as well as their Triticale Whiskey. (The Shelburne Hotel in Seaview, the Boardwalk Cottages and the Inn at Discovery Coast are sister establishments and equally cool.)
  • Located in the heart of downtown Long Beach, the Boreas Bed & Breakfast features a lovely handful of suites and a separate beach house. Each stay comes with a tasty breakfast and access to onsite features like their private hot tub and gardens.
  • For a quiet beach cottage setting, check out the Anchorage Cottages and Klipsan Beach Cottages, both located just north of Long Beach. Who doesn’t love waking up to a cup of coffee in a cozy beach cottage?
  • If you’re looking for great fish-n-chips and chowder in the heart of downtown Long Beach, stop by Castaways Seafood Grille. (Daily, 11:30am – 8pm) It’s also across the street from the amusement park and games – something for the whole family! But maybe hit the rides first… (Note: The Rides are currently closed for the season, but will hopefully return for the summer.)
  • Located directly next door to the crazy and amazing Marsh’s Museum on Pacific Ave South, Captain Bob’s Chowder serves delicious chowders, lobster rolls and more. (Daily, 11am – 5pm, closed Monday/Tuesday. Wow. I could really use some of their chowder right now…)
  • I love donuts. True story. And if I’m looking for a delicious donut fix while in Long Beach, I head directly to the Dylan’s Cottage Bakery & Delicatessen. (Try the cream cheese-stuffed croissants!) They also have a great deli with excellent sandwiches, soups, biscuits & gravy and more. Oh, and did I mention their delicious selection of PIES?? (Open daily, 4am – 5pm, 6pm Friday/Saturday)
  • Serving delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner in a cozy, old-school setting, the Drop Anchor Seafood & Grill is a great place to enjoy a meal after a day at the beach. Grab one of their chowder kits to take home and recreate the magic! (Daily, 11am – 7pm, with breakfast at 8am, Saturday/Sunday)
  • While also featuring great local seafood, the Australian-themed Lost Roo also serves up great burgers, sandwiches and drinks. (Fill up your growlers!) Adding to their festive atmosphere, it’s a great place to visit whenever a game is on. (Daily, 11:30am – 9pm, 10pm Friday/Saturday)
  • Feel like channeling your inner pirate? The family-friendly Hungry Harbor Grille features old-fashioned hamburgers and hot dogs, fish-n-chips, chowder and handmade milkshakes. Check out their Sunday Breakfast Buffet from 9-11am. Pet-friendly seating outside! (Daily, 11am – 7pm, 8pm Friday/Saturday)

It’s no secret that 2020 was a dark year. The Arts, festivals, concerts and many of our treasured activities were all put on hold. As things hopefully start to open up in the coming year, we can begin to enjoy artistic gatherings and celebration again. If you happen to be in the Long Beach area, here are a few options to consider:

  • If you are looking for quirky, crazy history and a treasure trove of wacky souvenirs and antiques, Marsh’s Free Museum is hands-down the place to be. Established in 1921, Marsh’s – and Jake the Alligator Man – have been greeting visitors for generations. I always come out of this place with things I never knew I needed. (Open daily, 10am – 5pm, 6pm Friday/Saturday)
  • Operating June through September, the Columbia-Pacific Farmers Market showcases local produce, seafood, flowers, crafts and much more. (Fridays, 12-5pm)
  • Established in 1945, Cranguyma Farms is an important part of the Long Beach agricultural heritage. They specialize in delicious cranberries, blueberries and holly and feature a u-pick blueberry season from late July to September. They also feature beautiful, custom holly wreaths during the holiday season.
  • If you’re a fun-guy, or just really love mushrooms like I do, the Wild Mushroom Celebration is well worth checking out. Many restaurants in the area feature special menus and several local hotels offer lodging specials. (Usually October thru mid-November – Stay tuned for 2021 dates)
  • Should you be wishing for a live soundtrack for your beach adventure, the Water Music Festival features ongoing musical events. Upcoming is the Music in the Gardens (7/1/21) and the Jazz & Oysters event. (8/15/21) Presented by the Water Music Society, these shows are a lovely way to enjoy the beach life.
  • Keep an eye on the Events page for the Peninsula Arts Association. Much hope they will again be featuring gallery tours and events in 2021.
  • Hopefully returning in 2021, the long-running Long Beach Razor Clam Festival is a great way to celebrate the bounty of the area and enjoy A LOT of clams. YUM!
  • Regardless of your age, The Rides (seasonal) and the Funland Family Fun Center are excellent additions to a night on the town. Souvenirs, ice cream, candy and all manner of treats (taffy, fudge, cotton candy, etc.) can be found in abundance. Who doesn’t love saltwater taffy at the beach?? (Located on Pacific Ave S and open daily, 10am – 10pm) And don’t forget to check out the WORLD’S LARGEST FRYING PAN, located next to The Rides! (Come on. There are certain things one just needs to experience in life. The WORLD’S LARGEST FRYING PAN clearly falls into that category.)

Heading north out of Long Beach on SR 103/Pacific Way will take you towards the lovely, coastal hamlets of Ocean Park, Nahcotta and Oysterville. (Note: The entire town of Oysterville is on the National Register of Historic Places!) These communities were important parts of the Clamshell Railroad which ran for decades through the area in the early 1900s. (While the railroad no longer runs, the Nahcotta train car is open twice a year for visitors in nearby Ilwaco.) These communities remain integral parts of the peninsula and have much to offer.

Just shy of the very tip of the peninsula, you’ll find beautiful Leadbetter Point State Park with its coastal trails, seaside forest, fishing and great clamming and crabbing opportunities. (Discover Pass required. Pro tip: The last part of the road to the main parking area for Leadbetter Point trail and beach access is single-lane and not the greatest for larger vehicles such as RVs.)

While making your way to this gorgeous, peaceful park, there are many excellent places to visit and things to do along the way:

  • Do not miss a visit to Jack’s County Store, located on the corner of SR-103 and Bay Avenue in Ocean Park. Established in 1885 when Washington was still a territory, it’s thought to be the oldest, continuously operating retail business in the state. It is full of great deals, an amazing array of goods and quirky awesomeness. (Not to mention, fresh grocery items and take-away!) Open daily, 7am – 8pm.
  • Located just off of SR-103, in the Ocean Park area, the Long Beach Peninsula Trading Post features a great variety of antiques and collectibles. This place is huge and could easily fill an afternoon. (Open daily, 10am – 5pm, closed Tuesday/Wednesday)
  • Check out Pacific Pines State Park day-park for great clamming, crabbing and picnicking opportunities along the coast. (Discover Pass required)
  • If you’re hoping to catch some Dungeness crab, head to the Port of Peninsula marina in Nahcotta. (Check the WDFW site before going for regulations, dates, etc. – And you’ll need a Shellfish & Seaweed License.) They also have an interpretive center and public boat launch. (Interpretive center open Memorial Day – Labor Day, Friday-Sunday and holidays, 11am – 4pm)
  • There is some amazing history to explore in the area and a walking tour of historic Oysterville is an excellent option. The Oysterville one-room school house and church are still in use and the Oysterville post office is the oldest continually operating post office in the state. It is said that Chief Klickeas of the Chinook Tribe originally introduced early settlers in the 1850s to its future namesake and main export, the oyster. For additional information, check out Sydney of Oysterville to learn more of the deep history of this area. Oysterville is a tiny hamlet indeed, but absolutely worth a look. Charming doesn’t begin to cover it!

If you weren’t able to catch your fill of shellfish or other seafood delicacies, there are several dining options in the area to help you on your way. Consider some delicious take-away to go with your relaxing hang on the beach!

  • Located just past downtown Long Beach, heading north on Pacific Avenue, the old-school burger joint, The Corral Drive-In is a great place to stop for a burger, fish sandwich, crinkle-fries, TOTS and more. Open daily, 11am – 8pm.
  • Grab a tasty sandwich at the Great Day Café (11:30am – 4pm, Tuesday – Saturday) and then head out for a round of golf on the adjoining Surfside Golf Course.
  • Check out Ocean Park’s MyCovio’s for Italian-inspired fare featuring local ingredients in a cozy setting. (Thursday through Sunday, 4-7pm) It’s recommended to call ahead for reservations, but take-out is also available.
  • For a great burger and local seafood specialties, stop in at Sara’s Rusty Spur Bar & Grill for a relaxing meal and frosty pint. (11am – 8pm, daily – 9pm Fri/Sat. Bar open to 11pm – Cash only, ATM inside.) Located on Bay Avenue in Ocean Park. They also have a dog-friendly deck area.
  • For a spot of tasty, Irish comfort food, head to the Crown Alley Irish Pub along Pacific Way in Ocean Park. (Open 4-10pm, Sunday-Thursday, Noon-11pm, Friday/Saturday, closed Tuesday/Wednesday) Hopefully they’ll again be able to host the awesome Coastal Celtic Music Festival in the coming year.
  • Speaking of festivals, the very fragrant and tasty Northwest Garlic Festival is set to tentatively return in September. I have a deep fondness for garlicky goodness and my fingers are crossed – and my garlic bulbs, braided. (September 18-19, 2021 at the Nahcotta Boat Basin)
  • Anita’s Coastal Café in Ocean Park is a cozy spot to stop for breakfast or lunch. Open daily, 8am to 1:45pm. Great local seafood features!
  • Also located in Ocean Park, The Berry Patch features hearty breakfasts and comfort-filled lunch and dinner plates, along with local seafood specialties. Open daily, 7am to 7pm.
  • Stop in at Willapa Oysters / Willapa Artisan Kitchen for fresh oysters, clams and take-away dishes to heat up at home. (Dungeness Crab Mac & Cheese, anyone??) They will also ship around the country. (Open daily, 11am – 6pm, located off SR-103 in the Oysterville area.)
  • If you’re roaming around the peninsula on the weekend, stop in at legendary Oysterville Sea Farms for fresh clam chowder, oysters and clams, wine and beer. There is also public access to Willapa Bay. (Friday – Sunday, 9:30am to 5pm) I’m still dreaming of the oysters and crab I enjoyed on my recent trip. The freshest, most delicious oysters I’ve ever had! WOW!

After taking in all of the sights and making your way to the tip of the peninsula, unless you have an awesome boat, it’s time to head back south. Not to worry, the drive is beautiful and there’s still a great bit of Pacific County to see south of Long Beach. We’re not done yet!

Head back down SR-103 towards Long Beach and continue forward onto US-101, just past Seaview. This will take directly into the little town of Ilwaco, tucked snugly into scenic Baker Bay. Looking out towards Oregon and enjoying the last waters of the Columbia River as they head out to sea, Ilwaco is a great place to spend a relaxing weekend as well as a jumping-off point for river and ocean adventures.

The general vibe in Ilwaco has always been relaxed and fairly chill when I’ve visited, but they do have their days of festivity and celebration. Whether it’s reveling in local waters, bounty or industry, Ilwaco has much to celebrate. Typically occurring during the second weekend of October and sponsored by the Columbia-Pacific Heritage Museum (Temporarily closed – Reopens June 1st), the Cranberrian Fair is a great way to pay homage to one of the area’s most important exports, the cranberry. Also sponsored by the museum is the Clamshell Railroad Days event during the third weekend of July. Hopefully both of these much-loved festivals will return in 2021.

Situated in the center of town, directly on Baker Bay, the Port of Ilwaco is a hub of activity and commerce. Home to local businesses, including great dining and hotel options, it’s a fine place to spend an afternoon or longer. Grab a bite to eat, a tasty beverage and gaze out onto the waterways – or take a strong along the Waterfront Walkway. (Part of the Lewis & Clark Discovery Trail) Not a bad way way to spend a day…

Just a few of the excellent options to check out on your next visit to the Port of Ilwaco:

  • Considering Ilwaco’s beautiful location, history and environment, it is no wonder it’s a great spot for artists. The waterfront area features several galleries and it’s easy to spend an afternoon taking it all in. On my most recent visit, I had the unexpected pleasure of meeting one of the artists and connecting the dots to a piece of art I’d picked up on my last visit to the area. I stopped in at the Don Nisbett Art Gallery and very quickly realized he was the artist responsible for the awesome 12th Salmon magnet I’d picked up at the Nelson Crab shop in Tokeland. I was so excited to meet the maker, but equally happy to enjoy a much broader view of his work. (And pick up a few more fun pieces, which he kindly autographed!) Dan is also a great resource for local information and stories – be sure to hit him up on your next visit! Should you be in town on the first Friday of the month in June through September, be sure to check out the First Friday art walk from 4-7pm along the waterfront.
  • If you happen to be visiting during late spring or the summer, check out the vibrant Saturday Market at the Port and enjoy local artisan goods, produce and more. (Opening Day, May 1st, 10am. Open May-Sept.)
  • In need of a caffeine boost? Stop by Roots Juice, Java & Salad Bar for a great cup of coffee or fresh juice – and a nice salad. (Open daily, 7am to 1:30pm, 6:30am to 10:30 on Saturdays, closed Sundays.)
  • Located just up from the port, the seasonal Serious Pizza serves up delicious pizza, sandwiches and more. Open during the spring months on Friday – Sunday from 11am – 7pm. During the summer months, they’re open Wednesday – Sunday from 11am – 7pm. (Closed November – February)
  • For a comfortable, but very hip stay in the area, head to the Salt Hotel & Pub, located by the marina and overlooking the port. The newly restored hotel is also host to the Salt Pub with its hearty pub fare and dog-friendly patio. I wanted at least a couple more orders of their clams. Delicious! (Thursday – Monday, 11:30am – 7pm, 8pm on Friday/Saturday. Pub closed Tuesday/Wednesday)
  • Bringing a little swank to the port area, the At the Helm Hotel & Pub is both comfortable and upscale. Located by the marina, this boutique hotel also features excellent dining at the Waterline Pub. (Open Thursday – Sunday.) In addition to great lodging and delicious local fare, they also host onsite yoga classes (Friday-Sunday), in-house massage and offer cruiser bike rentals. Enjoy a complimentary glass of beer/wine on check-in!
  • I was very excited to pick up some Sturgeon and freshly caught sole on my recent visit to Fish People seafood, located on the Ilwaco waterfront. Great prices, friendly staff and an excellent spot near the water – you can’t go wrong! (Open Thursday – Sunday, 10am – 5:30pm) 
  • For more great lodging in the Ilwaco area, check out the Inn at Harbour Village (c. 1926) in downtown Ilwaco or the relaxing China Beach Retreat, just up the road towards Cape Disappointment State Park.  (Currently under renovation and temporarily closed)

Due to its strategic location near both fresh and salt waters, Ilwaco boasts several fishing charters and opportunities to catch that big one. Let the area experts show you around the area and help you in your quest.

  • Seabreeze Charters offers great fishing tours of area waters. Hit them up during sturgeon season (May 10 – June 5th) and try your hand at reeling in one of the prehistoric-looking monsters. Sturgeon can live for years and easily grow 6 feet and more. Growing up, I often swam in the Columbia and was sincerely hoping to never bump into one. That said, they prefer the deeper water, so that’s good… Seabreeze also features salmon, albacore and halibut fishing when in season.
  • Featuring fishing tours and lodging, the family-run Coho Charters & Motel offers sturgeon and salmon fishing trips on the Columbia River as well as crabbing tours out at sea.
  • Maybe fishing isn’t your bag. Maybe you want to enter your awesome yacht in a marathon race from Ilwaco all the way to Victoria B.C. (Also, can I come along?) Throw your life preserver into the ring and sign up for the yearly Pacific NW Yacht Race and give those sea legs a good stretch. (First week of May) The race didn’t happen in 2020, but hopefully you can bring me along in 2021. I’d even be amenable to 2022… 2023?

One of my very favorite parts of the entire state can be found just up the road from Ilwaco. Set upon windy bluffs, overlooking the merging waters of the Columbia River and Pacific Ocean, Cape Disappointment State Park and its stunning lighthouses are a must-visit in Pacific County. (Discover Pass recommended, but you can purchase day passes on site.) The beauty, historical significance and adventure potential of this area are incomparable. In fact, the entire area is on the National Register of Historic Places.

As the area is apparently one of the foggiest places in the US with over 2500 hours a year of fog, the North Head Lighthouse (c. 1898) and the Cape Disappointment Lighthouse (c. 1856 – Oldest operating lighthouse in the Pacific NW) are much needed and appreciated beacons of safety. That said, it’s always been sunny when I’ve visited. (Guess I don’t always bring the grey skies of Seattle with me…) Be sure to bring varied outerwear, plenty of water and a good flashlight or headlamp. (We’ll get to the flashlight part in a bit…)

Stop in at the excellent Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center and learn all about the history and beauty of the area. Perched atop a 200-foot high cliff, it offers an amazing view of the North Jetty as it aids passage over the Columbia River Bar and into the Pacific Ocean. (The South Jetty aids passage from the Oregon side of the river) This convergence, also known as “The Graveyard of the Pacific,” hosts the very waters viewed by the Lewis & Clark Corp of Discovery as their 18-month, 3,700-mile journey from Missouri came to its fruition on November 7th, 1805.  

Along with serving as the epic entrance to the Pacific Ocean, the area has been home to the local Chinook Tribe for millennia. Skilled stewards of the land and water, they were instrumental in helping Lewis & Clark and their Corp of Discovery survive the harsh winter in the area and meet their expedition goals. Unfortunately, this friendship was tested when the expedition stole one of the Chinook Tribe’s canoes. It wasn’t until long after the fact that descendants of the Clark family “returned” the canoe to its rightful owners. (The Clark family presented a replica, 36’ seaworthy canoe to the Chinook Tribe in 2011.)

During your visit to the cape, don’t miss out on the many areas to explore. Grab your flashlight and snake in and out of the coastal defense batteries placed strategically throughout the grounds. As early as 1862, the cape has been providing defense for the nation and these batteries were in service throughout WW II. It’s both fascinating and sobering to wander through these narrow passageways and ponder the degree of force Washington State was prepared to release from its shores. (Don’t forget your flashlight!)

If you forgot your flashlight, rest assured there are many other activities to enjoy in the park. Put on your hiking boots and enjoy one of the many trails throughout the park. The Beards Hollow and Bell’s View trails leading up to the North Head Lighthouse are spectacular and the Coastal Forest and Benson Beach trails are also not to be missed. Actually walking to the end of the North Jetty which is just next to Benson Beach was truly awe-inspiring.

Consider extending your stay in the area by taking advantage of the ample camping spots, not to mention the 14 yurts, 3 Cabins and 3 lighthouse keeper’s residences/ vacation homes. This would certainly make hitting up the Lewis & Clark Discovery Trail between Cape Disappointment State and Long Beach much more doable. (8.5 miles one-way. Only trail in park that allows bikes. Rent one in Ilwaco!) Or you can always throw in at the boat launch from Baker Bay on the Columbia River for some crabbing action near the North Jetty or hit up Benson Beach for a bit of clamming. (Shellfish and boat launch permits required.) And hopefully you’ll be able to end your night by taking in a show as part of the Waikiki Beach Concert Series. (June – August, every other Saturday. Cancelled for 2020.)

We’re nearing the end of our Pacific County adventure, but there are still a few great stops to enjoy on your way home. As I’m always up for a bit of meandering, I like to drive towards Chinook on US-101 and then SR-401 up to SR-4 out of the tiny community of Naselle. Heading towards Chinook is also advised if you plan on heading over the Columbia River towards lovely Astoria, Oregon or Wahkiakum County and on to I-5. (Important note: Goonies never say die!) 

Traveler Advisory: SR-401 is presently closed one mile east of US 101 due to roadway settlement. Keep an eye on the WSDOT website for updates on reopening. Use alternate routes.

Following this route will bring you by these great spots:

  • For a great cup of coffee and delicious cookies and pastries, stop in at Chinook Coffee Co. and fuel up for your coastal drive. (Daily, 7am – 3pm. Sometimes 4pm.)
  • For tasty pub fare and a good drink, check out the Columbia River Roadhouse in Chinook. They also feature live music and a casual, sports bar ambiance. (12-7pm, Tuesday – Thursday, 12-9pm Friday/Saturday. Closed Sunday/Monday.)
  • If you’re a history buff, plan a stop at the Fort Columbia Historical State Park just past Chinook and shortly before the bridge to Astoria, along the Columbia River. The area is small as compared to nearby coastal defense sites, but Fort Columbia is considered one of the United States’ most intact coastal defense sites and the Fort Columbia Interpretive Center is filled will artifacts and stories of the area’s history. (Temporarily closed due to Covid-19) In addition to a self-guided interpretive historic walk around the fort, there are a couple miles of hiking trails as well as two, charming vacation houses should you be interested in staying longer in the area.
  • Just before arriving at the bridge to Astoria sits the lovely St. Mary’s Station parish in tiny McGowan. There are nice trails to check out beginning from the parish parking lot and an absolutely beautiful view of the Columbia River. This is also the home of the Chinook Tribe’s Middle Village – Station Camp, an important part of Chinook life and trade and integral to their trade with the Lewis & Clark expedition.
  • Just past the bridge exit, along SR-401 sits the interestingly named spot, Dismal Nitch. It’s now a small rest area along the banks of the Columbia, but bears the historical distinction of hosting the Lewis & Clark expedition while they were riding out a severe winter storm before finally reaching the coast. So close, yet so far… (Travel Advisory: The rest area is presently closed for septic repairs. Keep an eye on the WSDOT website for updates on reopening.)
  • From Dismal Nitch, continue north on SR-401 up to the tiny Finnish community of Naselle. A portion of my family hails from Finland and I was very interested to learn how Finns found their way to this remote part of Washington. I didn’t need to look far as Naselle’s Appelo Archives Center answered many of my questions as I learned about the logging and fishing industries which drew Finnish and Scandinavian immigrants to the area. The museum and bookstore feature interesting exhibits and resources and the onsite café features delicious Finnish pastries and more. They also host the bi-annual Finnish-American Folk Festival which occurs in July. The 2020 event was cancelled due to Covid-19, so they are now set to return in 2022.
  • For other sightseeing and cultural opportunities in the area, check out the lovely Deep River Pioneer Lutheran Church (National Register of Historic Places, c. 1902) and the Knappton Cove Heritage Center (temporarily closed due to Covid-19), formerly known as the historic Columbia River Quarantine Station. (National Register of Historic Places, c. 1899)
  • There aren’t many dining options in the Naselle area, but the low-key Hunters Inn is known for its heart country-cooking and casual atmosphere. (Current hours, daily from 3-9pm)

And with that, it’s time to bring these Pacific County adventures to an end. For now… From Naselle, simply take SR-401 back up to SR-4 and head out to I-5 through Wahkiakum County. As there are so many areas to explore and enjoy in Pacific County, I find myself returning time and again. The beauty of the ocean, the Columbia River, coastal forests and delicious foodie opportunities will never get old. I can’t wait for my next visit – perhaps I’ll see you there. Say, would you happen to have a boat? Asking for a friend…

Until next time, please stay safe, get that vaccine and get ready to eat the state!

Cheers!

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Enjoy the ride with my Pacific County SPOTIFY PLAYLIST!

  • Ventura Highway – America (from Homecoming)
  • Reelin’ in the Years – Steely Dan (from Can’t Buy A Thrill)
  • Lovely Day – Bill Withers (from Menagerie)
  • I Can See Clearly Now – Johnny Nash (from I Can See Clearly Now)
  • Cool Change  – Little River Band (from First Under the Wire)
  • Feels So Good – Single Version – Chuck Mangione (from Chuck Mangione: A&M Gold Series)
  • Happier than the Morning Sun – Stevie Wonder (from Music of My Mind)
  • You Can Close Your Eyes – James Taylor (from Mud Slide Slim & the Blue Horizon)
  • Angel from Montgomery – Bonnie Raitt (from Streetlights)
  • Light Enough to Travel – The Be Good Tanyas (from Blue Horse)
  • It’s Too Late – Carole King (from Tapestry)
  • Let ‘Em In – Wings (from Wings at the Speed of Sound)
  • Doctor My Eyes – Jackson Browne (from Jackson Browne – Saturate Before Using)
  • Isis – Live at Montreal Forum, Montreal, Quebec – December 1975 – Bob Dylan (from The Rolling Thunder Review – The 1975 Live Recordings)
  • Find Yourself – Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real (from Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real)
  • Old Friend – Shooter Jennings (from The Wolf)
  • Long White Line – Sturgill Simpson (from Metamodern Sounds in Country Music)
  • The Life You Choose – Jason Isbell (from Something More than Free)
  • Something to Love – Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit (from The Nashville Sound)
  • You’ve Got A Friend in Me – From Toy Story – Randy Newman & Lyle Lovett (from Toy Story)
  • A Long Way to Get – Bob Schneider (from I’m Good Now)
  • The Boys of Summer – Don Henley (from Building the Perfect Beast)
  • Clean Getaway – Maria Taylor (from Lynn Teeter Flower)
  • Can’t Find My Way Home – Ellen McIlwaine (from Up From the Skies: The Polydor Years)
  • Life Is Beautiful – Keb’ Mo’ (from Just Like You/Suitcase)
  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea – Paolo Nutini & The Preservation Hall Jazz Band (from An Album to Benefit Preservation Hall & the Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program)
  • Smells Like Teen Spirit – The Muppet Barbershop Quartet (from The Muppets – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
  • The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on An Open Fire) – Mel Tormé (from That’s All)

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Check out more I Ate the State adventures:

I Ate the State – Island County

Happy New Year from I Ate the State! I’m quite certain it’s going to be a good one – and chock full of Washington State adventure.

To start the year off in coastal style, I’d like to share my recent adventures to the beautiful shores of Island County. Comprised primarily of Whidbey and Camano Islands and located in the upper northwest part of the state, Island County is a wonderful escape from the mainland commotion any time of year. Full of history, sweeping prairies and shorelines, there’s something for everyone to enjoy on these lovely little islands. Holding court as the second smallest county in Washington (by area), one might think there wouldn’t be much to see and do, but they’d be entirely wrong.

True to its name, Island County is indeed a seafaring destination. That said, there are also routes which quite nicely accommodate the four-wheeled traveler. On my recent journey, I hit up the excellent Washington State Ferry system as well as the bridges connecting both Camano and Whidbey Islands to the mainland. One of these days I’d love to arrive via sailboat… #BucketList

Cama View
Looking out towards the Olympics from Cama Beach

To arrive in Camano Island, I drove north on I-5 and took Exit 212 leading to Stanwood. After following SR-532 through Stanwood, I crossed over moody Davis Slough and the Stillaguamish River via the Camano Gateway Bridge and officially entered Island County. For an excellent day trip from the Seattle area, consider a combo visit to both Camano Island and the Stanwood area. While adjacent to each other, they actually span both Snohomish County and Island County. Travel bonus! There are great restaurants, outdoor opportunities and lodging in both areas, making for a great day trip or weekend getaway. For this adventure, however, I was sticking to the gorgeous shores of Island County.

As one of the two largest islands making up Island County, it can be easy at times to forget you’re actually on an island. Filled with beautiful stretches of farmland and forest, Camano Island is an idyllic slice of Northwest living. Driving around the island is a wonderful way to spend the day and the glimpses you’ll catch of surrounding Possession Sound and Port Susan make for a perfectly picturesque road trip.

One of the first places I wanted to visit was the beautiful Kristoferson Farm. Perched on a hill overlooking scenic farmland, this sixth-generation farm (c. 1912 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places) features organic lavender, hay and fruit crops as well as the zip-line outfit, Canopy Tours NW. While I will admit to still mentally recovering from my jungle zip-line incident near Puerto Vallarta, I plan on returning to conquer my zip-line fears on Camano Island in the near future.

To highlight their bounty, they feature related products in their onsite farm store and gift shop. I picked up some delicious culinary lavender on my visit and have been adding it to various bakery and beverage experimentations ever since. Yum! They also host regular farm-to-table Dinner in the Barn events featuring northwest wineries and chefs as well as lavender craft classes. I do plan on making a triumphant return to zip-lining, but I’d be a liar if I said the barn dinners weren’t absolute tops on my list…

If you’re looking for a unique challenge, but zip-lining isn’t your thing, check out some AXE THROWING action just up the road at Arrowhead Ranch. They feature shared and private axe-throwing lanes as well as various workshops. In particular, their Live-Edge Charcuterie Board class is high on my list of things to check out. Wood-working shenanigans which include hors d’oeuvres and local wine? I’m IN! (I wonder if you drink wine while using power tools…)

While Arrowhead Ranch doesn’t offer onsite food or beverage, they do encourage the bring-your-own plan. Located nearby is the excellent Camano Commons, the local hub for restaurants, coffee, gifts and more. Some of the great options to check out:

There are many excellent spots from which to enjoy the shoreline views as well as Camano’s beautiful forested areas. Peoples of the Coast Salish Native American tribes have been visiting the island for thousands of years to harvest the bounty of seafood, berries and to benefit from the natural wonders. The area has been pivotal to the culture of native peoples as well as Euro-American settlers who began moving to the area in the mid-1800s. Driving, hiking, biking and boating around the island – whatever your mode of transportation – it’s easy to understand the appeal and importance of this beautiful locale.

During my own meandering around the island, I spent a bit of time exploring the lovely Cama Beach Historical State Park. Located on the western side of the island, overlooking the Saratoga Passage and onward towards the Olympic Mountains, the park is a true Camano Island gem. Long a destination for vacationing Northwesterners and included on the National Register of Historic Places, the park has been welcoming visitors to its beach-side cedar cabins since 1934. It felt a bit like stepping into a PNW version of the old-school resort in Dirty Dancing… (And remember: NOBODY puts baby in the corner!)

In addition to the Cama Beach Resort cabins, the charming park features a great picnic area, many miles of beautiful hiking trails, the seasonal Cama Beach Store and an events center. If boating is your thing, the Center for Wooden Boats offers boat-building classes and the park features a boat launch and rentals. (Row, sail and motor) And should cabin or outdoor cooking not be your thing, head to the Cama Beach Café for tasty dining options. (Open daily from June thru Labor Day and on weekends for breakfast/lunch, September thru May)

For further enjoyment of the Camano Island shoreline, stroll up the one-mile trail leading south to neighboring Camano Island State Park. (Or hit up nearby Lowell Point Road via West Camano Drive for a quick car ride) While this park also has a small handful of cabins, they feature a large camping area which accommodates both tent and RV camping. In addition to relaxing in the cozy campsites, check out the boating scene and perhaps do a bit of crabbing or saltwater fishing. And as is the case with all Washington State parks, a Discover Pass is recommended for park access. (Daily passes for $10 are also available onsite)

Since it was such a beautiful day on my visit, I opted for a little beach picnic to make the most of the sunshine. In addition to beach picnics, there are several other great dining options on the island. A few places to consider on your next Camano getaway:

  • Not too far from Camano Island State Park, Journey’s End Café (formerly Kara’s Kitchen) offers great burgers, pizza and more. Grab it to go and head back to the beach! They also host regular game nights and feature live music on weekends.
  • Located just across the way from the Kristoferson Farm, Rockaway Bar & Grill serves NW style fare featuring local ingredients. Fresh oysters, fish and produce make for some very delicious menu options.
  • If you happen to be visiting the island during the first weekend of the month and are feeling parched, check out Dusty Cellars Winery and Edward Lynne Cellars for a bit of wine-tasting enjoyment. (First weekend of each month – check websites for hours)
  • Should you like to extend your Camano stay and further enjoy the local scene, head north of Cama Beach State Park on West Camano Drive to the beautiful Camano Island Inn. They feature well-appointed rooms, stunning views and a great location from which to explore the island.

Pro tip: There are many great lodging options on the island – Hit up VRBO and Airbnb to peruse the many possibilities.

Camano Island is fairly large, but it’s still possible to cover the entire island on an afternoon drive. In pursuit of this goal, I was driving around the southern tip of the island, enjoying the views of Port Susan to the east, when I came upon the quaint Tyee Grocery and Farms. After picking up a coffee and quick snack, I continued down East Camano Drive, but was inspired to pull over not too far down the road. I spotted a few art installations and a very cool little lending library with a small, adjacent parking area. A beautiful drive, a little Art and some cool books – Nice! Definitely keep your eyes peeled while rambling around the island as there are great finds around so many of its corners.

Upon wrapping up my tour of Camano Island, it was time to head to neighboring Whidbey Island to continue my coastal adventures. Granted, I did end up making an additional trip to Whidbey Island on a later excursion, but it is absolutely possible to do a grand tour of both islands on a long day or weekend overnighter. That said, it’s hard to not to spend a little extra time in the Deception Pass area as it is positively stunning. And that’s exactly what happened on my first trip out…

Island County
Entering Island County! (As seen from Deception Pass Bridge)

If you happen to have a boat, (#LifeGoals) you can indeed head over the Saratoga Passage from Camano Island to get to Whidbey Island, the largest island in Washington State. The Saratoga Passage is a beautiful stretch of water and a popular section of the Puget Sound waterways. There are no ferries that go between Camano and Whidbey, but you can sometimes see private passenger boats like the Victoria Clipper cruising through both Saratoga Passage and Deception Pass when waters are rough in the nearby Strait of Juan de Fuca. There are also great whale-watching tours such as Deception Pass Tours which regularly travel through the area.

The Coast Salish and Lower Skagit tribes (Now recognized within the Swinomish Nation in neighboring Skagit County) have been stewards of these waters and islands for thousands of years. It’s easy to see how this beautiful, bountiful area could hold such importance to coastal living. Camano Island has many treasures to share, but with Whidbey being the larger island, the bounty is even more plentiful. It is entirely possible to enjoy sweeping forests, coastlines and wide-open prairies on a visit to Whidbey; All of these environments providing a wealth of resources to the enduring island community.

Since I wanted to drive over Deception Pass (on the National Register of Historic Places) to arrive on Whidbey Island, I took Exit 230 off I-5 North (near Burlington in Skagit County) to access SR-20. (SR-20 is also known as the North Cascades Highway or the spectacular Cascade Loop) Once heading west on SR-20, I followed the road until it turned off to the left, just before Anacortes. If you prefer a more seafaring route, take the Mukilteo/Clinton Ferry or Port Townsend/Coupeville Ferry and avoid the crowds of the I-5 corridor. (For another travel bonus trip, link your Island County adventures with Port Townsend and beautiful Jefferson County)

Crossing over Deception Pass is quite a spectacular experience. Whether via car, bike, or foot, it is a beautiful sight to behold. If you happen to be leery of heights, walking over it might not be your bag, but it is well worth the consideration. On my Ragnar Northwest Passage adventure, one of our runners had the opportunity to run across the bridge around sunrise and I’m sure it was amazing. I was traveling over the bridge in the team van at the time and even that was an amazing scene. (The sunrise. Not a bunch of stinky runners piled in a van… not as amazing.) I must admit, however, as much as I love heights, I was completely content to merely walk across the bridge on my own adventure. (Details of my actual bridge visit are included in my Skagit County article)

In addition to the bridge itself, Deception Pass State Park is truly beautiful and should be a must-visit on any list of Northwest destinations. Spanning both Skagit and Island Counties via the bridge, the park has a plethora of camping, hiking, boating, fishing and beach opportunities to enjoy. After becoming a state park in 1922, the Civilian Conservation Corps built roads, buildings and trails and many of the park structures are now on the National Register of Historic Places. It’s easy to feel you’ve stepped back into a quieter, less hectic era when visiting the park. (Check out the in-park CCCs Interpretive Center to learn more about the history of the park.) Don’t miss a visit to this spectacular part of the state! (For even more exploration of the area, stop in a few miles down the road at Deception Pass State Park’s sister park, Dugualla State Park.)

After enjoying the striking scenery of the Deception Pass area, I traveled further south along SR-20 towards the largest city on the island, Oak Harbor. Home to the Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, Oak Harbor is a bustling and vibrant island community. The area is a fun place to explore as well as a center for tasty dining and fun shopping opportunities – and keep an eye out for the naval planes regularly flying overhead.

Naval Base
Just an everyday scene on SR-20 into Oak Harbor…

As you’re coming through town on SR-20, there are quite a few great dining options. All of that adventuring at Deception Pass can make one hungry and there are several great establishments to check out along the main thoroughfare. Just a few of the delicious options:

  • Stop in at Flyers Restaurant & Brewery for great local beers, tasty burgers and more. Located directly off SR-20.
  • Stock up on delicious smoked salmon at Seabolt’s Smokehouse off of SR-20 or hang out and enjoy their lunch and dinner menu. Their clam chowder and Penn Cover oysters are very tasty!
  • The hours are short, but a visit to Kau Kau Corner is well worth the timing. Specializing in Hawaiian comfort food, they offer tempting dishes such as Kalua pork and Spam musubi. (Mon-Fri, 11am – 4pm – Located directly off SR-20)
  • Don’t let the name fool you. In addition to great, organic coffee, Rock Island Coffee has a full menu which includes beer and wine. Check out their skillet mac-n-cheese! (Open ‘til 5pm, M-Sat and 3pm on Sundays)
  • If you’re looking for a classic Oak Harbor joint, check out Island Café, located directly off SR-20. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner with a classic diner flair.
  • During the late spring and summer, stop in at the Oak Harbor Farmers Market and enjoy some great local produce and artisan goods. (Thursdays, 4-7pm, right off SR-20)

On any visit to Oak Harbor, it’s a great idea to visit the historic Main Street part of town. This waterfront area is filled with fun shops, great restaurants and regular events. It’s the heart of Oak Harbor and can easily accommodate a leisurely day on the town. The full-service Oak Harbor Marina is also located in this area if you happen to be arriving via boat. (#INeedABoat)

On your next visit to Oak Harbor, check out these great spots in the historic downtown waterfront area:

  • Not far before turning off SR-20 to head towards the waterfront, hit up Wicked Teuton Brewing Co. & Homebrew Supply for a tasty local brew or craft soda. This family and pet-friendly taproom is open daily at 11am – Check website for closing times.
  • There are several fun shopping stops to make in the downtown area. A couple of my favorites are the ridiculously cute Popsies with their excellent selection of treats and Purple Moon with their eclectic selection of gifts and more. And don’t forget to stop in at Whidbey Beer Works to peruse their large selection of specialty beers, ciders, wine and meads. (They also do occasional tasting events)

  • Grab a great cup of coffee for your stroll around the waterfront at Whidbey Coffee Co. In addition to their downtown location, they have 11 others in Western Washington. Fun fact: Contrary to their name, they are actually headquartered across the water in Mukilteo, whereas the excellent Mukilteo Coffee Roasters is based on Whidbey Island in nearby Langley. Shenanigans!
  • Closed for the holidays on my recent visit, Chris’ Bakery (since 1948) has been – and will hopefully continue – making delicious pastries, pies, cakes and more for many years to come. Their sweet treats are delicious, but don’t miss out trying their meat pies and amazing bread as well!

  • I enjoyed a tasty, diner-style breakfast on my last visit to Oak Harbor at the Riverside Café. Classic décor and a small, adjacent bar make this a cool spot to visit any time of day. (Breakfast, lunch and dinner)

  • On the finer dining side, head to Rustica Café & Wine Bar (Open at noon, 10am on Sundays for brunch), the Terrace Wine Bar and Bistro (3-10pm, closed Sun/Mon) and lovely Fraser’s Gourmet Hideaway (Tues – Sat, 4:30 – 9:30pm, closed Sun/Mon) for a tasty day or night on the town.
  • If you’re looking to celebrate all things Oak Harbor, be sure to hit up their annual Holland Happening International Festival every April. Pioneer Way and the waterfront is blocked off for craft and food vendors as well live music and beer gardens. (April 23-26, 2020)
  • If you’d like to work off some of that downtown decadence, head a little further towards the water and check out the Wildwood Farm B&B. This equestrian-friendly, 80-acre farm features horse boarding, instruction, training and indoor/outdoor arenas. Guests can also stay in a remodeled 1914 bunkhouse and enjoy beautiful walking trails during their stay. Dreamy!

Heading further south on SR-20 will bring you through some magnificent scenery. There are beautiful farms, pastures and sweeping vistas around every turn and one would be hard-pressed to get bored of the views. The drive itself is interesting, but there are several great stops along the way. One such destination is the awesome Blue Fox Drive-in Theater. Entertaining Whidbey Island since 1959, they feature movies, go-karts, concessions and arcade games. When was the last time you went to a drive-in movie?? Sigh…

In keeping with my, “Hmmm – maybe there’s something cool off in that direction – I should check” plan, I turned off SR-20 onto Hastie Lake Road. I had no idea where it would lead, but the landscapes were gorgeous and I thought maybe it would head towards the water. (But then, most paths on an island typically do at some point…) I’m very glad I did as the drive was stunning and beyond idyllic. Along the way, I passed lovely farmland and spots where I’m pretty sure time had stood still. Around one bend, I stumbled upon the charming Hennrich Tree Farm, busy in full-operation for the holiday season.

Not too far past the tree farm and much as expected, I reached the shoreline. Conveniently located at the intersection of Hastie Lake Road and West Beach Road was the tiny, but perfectly-positioned Hastie Lake County Park. Situated on the shoreline in between private beaches, it was a beautiful spot to pull over and enjoy the view and it brought back some wonderful, unexpected memories.

When I was very young, my family made a couple of visits to Whidbey Island to visit friends. (All the way from very non-coastal Eastern WA) I have vivid memories of their house overlooking the water and a cool rope ladder leading down the bluff to the private beach below. Standing on the shores of Hastie Lake County Park and looking down the beach at the homes overlooking the water brought me right back to my 5-year-old self. I remember being absolutely charmed by coastal living and can honestly say that nothing has since changed. Just dreamy…

Just as I’d hoped, it was both an easy and beautiful loop drive back to SR-20 beginning on West Beach Road. Once back on the highway, I continued south towards my next planned destination, Fort Ebey State Park and Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. I’d been wanting to visit these areas for quite some time and since there was a fortuitous break in the rain, it seemed like the perfect opportunity.

Pro tip: As helpful as on-board and mobile GPS can be, it’s always good to have a map or printed directions of the area on hand. It’s common to lose satellite or mobile connections in the more remote and forested areas – be prepared! And in the least, have a full tank, water and SNACKS at the ready. Mmm… Snacks…

The first area I visited was Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. On the National Register of Historic Places and the first National Historic Reserve in the US (established by Congress in 1978 and one of only three presently in the country), the entire area is a one of the most remarkable stretches of land in the state. (And beyond!) I’m sad I hadn’t visited sooner, but am completely grateful to have finally experienced this stunning, expansive beauty in person.

Driving up the access road, the view of gorgeous prairies began to stretch out in front of me as I gained elevation up the hillside. While the prairies expanded, so did the amazing view of the shoreline, making room for the glimmering skyline in the distance. The way the sun was lighting the horizon was exquisite and I can definitively say it was one of the most beautiful views I’ve ever seen.

Ebey Landing
Looking out towards the water from Ebey Landing

The Lower Skagit Tribe has been gazing out over these vistas for thousands of years with western settlements beginning to populate the region in the 1850s. One of the first homesteads was plotted by Whidbey pioneers, Isaac Ebey and his wife, Rebecca Davis. After having established himself in the Olympia area, Isaac brought his family over from Missouri to cultivate the sprawling farmland which is now known as Ebey’s Landing. Their home still stands along with defense blockhouses and acres of presently farmed area.

A leisurely hike through the area via the Ebey’s Landing trails is a must for any Whidbey Island visit and nicely showcases a landscape that has scarcely changed over the last few hundred years. Even just a drive up to the Prairie Landing Overlook to enjoy the coastal and farmland views is well worth it. (Located just across the road from Sunnyside Cemetery (c. 1865) and the Davis Blockhouse. Isaac Ebey and Rebecca Davis as well as Coupeville’s namesake, Thomas Coupe are laid to rest in this cemetery.)

Not too far north up the coast and included within the National Historical Reserve lies Fort Ebey State Park. If you’re up for camping, this is a great location from which to explore the area. Not only is there ample camping, the area is popular with paragliders and surfers and the beaches serve as great seaweed gathering spots in the spring. If you’d like to do some smallmouth bass fishing, check out lovely Lake Pondilla, found in the park’s interior. (Note: Until a recent double-check on my research, I was convinced the name was actually Lake PondZILLA. And that’s what I’ll be personally referring to it as moving forward… But hey, score one for double-checking your research! I had a whole backstory worked out in my head and everything! A fisherman must’ve caught a GIANT fish at some point and told his buddies he caught a Godzilla fish in the pond… Come on, it makes sense! I can’t lie – I feel a little let down…)

While visiting the park, be sure to check out the WWII era battery and gun emplacements. Bring a flashlight and snake through the darkened corridors of the island’s military history. Continue your explorations along the stunning Kettles Trail System which connects the park to the reserve as well as the epic Pacific NW National Scenic Trail. The views and vistas found along these coastal trails are gorgeous and not to be missed. (Even minus the Godzilla Fish…)

Just over from Fort Ebey State Park and off SR-20, lies the historic center of Whidbey Island, the ever-charming Coupeville. While not incorporated until 1910, it is actually the second oldest town in the state. (Steilacoom is the oldest incorporated town in the state) Western settlement began in the 1850s and was led by the city’s namesake, Captain Thomas Coupe. Serving as the county seat and featuring a wonderful, historic waterfront and wharf area (c. 1905), Coupeville is a wonderful town to explore and an excellent look into the evolution of Washington State. Be sure to stop in at the Island County Historical Museum located near the waterfront for an in-depth look at the area’s fascinating history.

Nestled alongside beautiful Penn Cove, Coupeville is fairly compact, making it easy to explore. That said, there are many treasures packed into its tiny downtown and it’s advisable to plan on spending at least a day in the area. The Coupeville Wharf (on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve, along with Coupeville in general), is a great place to start your explorations. The views of Penn Cove, downtown Coupeville and Front Street are picture-perfect and the subject of many a northwest photo op.

Grab a cup of coffee at Coffee on the Cove, housed inside the wharf building and enjoy investigating the interpretive displays and exhibits courtesy of the Marine Education Center. Also housed in the historic building is the funky Harbor Gifts shop as well as newly reopened restaurant, The Cove. (Formerly the Cove Café. Note: As of this writing, Yelp and Trip Advisor say they’re closed, but the new owners have recently reopened the spot…) When you’ve finished your visit, head back down to the sailboat you’ve moored nearby and enjoy the beauty of Penn Cove. (#BoatDreams)

Coupeville’s downtown Front Street is an absolutely delightful place to spend an afternoon. Packed into a few blocks are charming shops, restaurants and galleries, all nestled along the shores of beautiful Penn Cove. Consider checking out the walking tour offered by the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association or discover the area at your own leisure. Either approach will be filled with great finds and tasty treats. A few of the intriguing spots you’ll find along the way:

  • Located next to the wharf boardwalk, Collections Boutique features clothing, accessories and beach-themed gifts.
  • If you’re looking for a cool, local bookstore, check out Kingfisher Bookstore. The building, itself, constructed in 1874 is alone worth a visit and once housed the popular, Benson’s Confectionery. (c. 1915)
  • For all things quirky and hilarious, Far From Normal is the perfect stop. I picked up everything from vintage sheet music to soap and old school candies. Definitely my kind of place…
  • For a lovely selection of clothing, shoes, gift items, soaps and more, stop in at the very quaint Aqua Gifts.
  • Celebrate the NW Dutch influence at A Touch of Dutch. They feature Dutch foods and tasty treats, blue Delftware and more in their incredibly cozy shop.
  • Sporting an excellent view of Penn Cove, Front Street Grill offers tasty seafood and NW coastal dining in their lovely waterfront building. Try some of the famous Penn Cove mussels!
  • Take a break from exploring the shops and enjoy a nice glass of wine at the Vail Wine Shop & Tasting Room. A great glass of vino and an amazing view of Penn Cove – sign me up!
  • Oh, wow… the bread! Stop in at super cute and deliciously tasty Little Red Hen Bakery for fresh baked bread and bakery specialties. Community supported and island sustained!
  • Recently rescued and now under restoration, the Haller House provides a great look at Coupeville’s past. Built on the original land claim of Thomas Coupe, it is an important piece of Coupeville’s history and will be a fine re-addition to the Front Street scene.

For more great shopping and dining options, check out the blocks just above Front Street and the Waterfront area. There is also a nice public parking area adjacent to the Coupeville Library, located just past the Bayleaf shop…

  • The Bayleaf shop features the stuff of foodie dreams. Wonderful artisan meats and cheeses, specialty foods and a great wine selection. Grab things to go or order one of their amazing sandwiches to enjoy in-house.
  • Stop in at Currents Bistro for delicious NW-inspired fare and island ambiance. Featuring locally sourced ingredients, their dishes are delectable.
  • I’m going to have to return to Coupeville soon so I can again try to visit The Oystercatcher. I’ve heard many great things and was excited to stop in, but the line was literally pressed up against the door when I peeked in. Next time!! Mmmm… Oysters… (Their bread has such a following it inspired the creation of the aforementioned Little Red Hen Bakery!)
  • While their local lavender farm doesn’t re-open for the season until June, the lovely Lavender Wind Farm shop is open in downtown Coupeville. (Just across from the Oystercatcher) Walking into the store is like walking into the French countryside. Sigh… Along with a wide variety of culinary and home-based lavender goods, they also feature a coffee bar and baked goods. I greatly enjoyed their lavender caramels and can’t wait to get my hands on some more!
  • Check out Ciao for deliciously crafted pizza, salads and fresh seafood as well as a great lounge area and regular live music. Located just up from downtown on North Main Street.
  • Located on South Main Street, a mile of so west of the downtown core, Penn Cove Brewing Company is an excellent place to take a break. They feature tasty brews, a small menu and various weekly specials. (Also in nearby communities, Oak Harbor and Freeland)

The Coupeville area has many wonderful lodging opportunities, including several traditional B&Bs. You can’t miss the stately Anchorage Inn B&B on North Main Street, just before you enter the Waterfront area and the lovely Blue Goose Inn B&B can be spotted just before. The Compass Rose B&B, with its charming, minty green exterior can be found on South Main Street and for something a little less traditional, consider the rustic, shoreline cabins and rooms at the wonderfully unique Captain Whidbey Inn. They also feature a restaurant and tavern as well as accessibility via boat and seaplane! (Additionally, the drive there via coastal Madrona Way is beautiful!) If camping is your thing, Rhododendron Park, located in Coupeville proper, offers tent and RV camping and great access to local hiking trails.

Shellfish tip: If you’d like to try your hand at gathering some of the famous, local shellfish, the area near Captain Whidbey is wonderful. Check out the West Penn Cove and Twin Lagoons areas, located at the base of Penn Cove. West Penn Cove has clams, mussels & oysters (Mid-July thru Mid-Sept only) and Twin Lagoons has clams, mussels and oysters year-round. Be sure to check the DOH website on day of harvest to ensure the beach is open for shellfish harvesting.

There are already countless things to do in the Coupeville area, but they up the ante with several annual festivals in addition to many surrounding farms to visit and enjoy. A few more reasons to spend some time in Coupeville:

  • Celebrate the jewels of the area at the yearly Penn Cove MusselFest (March 7-8, 2020)
  • Celebrate the waters that host the jewels of the area at the annual Penn Cove Water Festival (May 16, 2020)
  • Many artists and craftspeople call the island home and a great place to check out their wares is at the annual Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival (August 8-9, 2020)
  • Since 1946, Bell’s Farm has been providing delicious strawberries, produce and more to the island. Head over to their Strawberry Daze celebration in late June and stop by their Honesty Stand to stock up on baked goods, produce, eggs, lamb and strawberries.
  • Stop in at the 3 Sisters Family Farm (c. 1910) for all-natural, ethically and sustainably raised beef, pork, lamb and chickens. The beef and lamb are 100% grass-fed, the pork is fed barley raised on the Island and the chickens are cage-free. Visit their market for all products, snacks, local goods and beverages
  • For a great selection of goods from local farmers and artisans, head to the Coupeville Farmers Market for all things delicious. (Saturdays, April – Oct, 10am – 2pm)

Mirroring its sister, Fort Worden, across the way in Jefferson County, the fascinating Fort Casey Historical State Park is a must-add to your Whidbey Island itinerary. Built in the late 1800’s, Fort Casey, in combination with Fort Worden and nearby Fort Flagler (on Marrowstone Island), formed a very important part of the western US coastal defense network. It is easy to spend hours combing through the catacomb of bunkers and darkened corridors. (Don’t forget to bring a flashlight!) It is also easy to check out both Fort Casey and Fort Worden on a long afternoon. Just hop aboard the nearby Port Townsend/Coupeville ferry and you’re on your way! (Reservations are recommended for this ferry crossing.)